Die Präsentation wird geladen. Bitte warten

Die Präsentation wird geladen. Bitte warten

PY 04 Gesunder Charakter Dr. med. Samuel Pfeifer, Riehen

Ähnliche Präsentationen


Präsentation zum Thema: "PY 04 Gesunder Charakter Dr. med. Samuel Pfeifer, Riehen"—  Präsentation transkript:

1

2 PY 04 Gesunder Charakter Dr. med. Samuel Pfeifer, Riehen
Professor an der Evang. Hochschule Tabor, Marburg

3 Was ist ein gesunder Charakter?
Biblischer Text: Epheser 4,1-4 Demut Sanftmut, Freundlichkeit Geduld Liebe in Wahrheit (V. 15) 1. Timotheus 3,2 ff untadelig (integer) In geordneten Verhältnissen Nüchtern Massvoll Würdig – Anstand - Wertschätzung Gastfreundlich Geschickt im Lehren Kein Säufer Nicht gewalttätig Nicht streitsüchtig Nicht geldgierig

4 Begabung und Herausforderung
Leiter haben viele positive Eigenschaften, die sie zu Führungspersonen machen. Leiter haben auch Versuchungen und dunkle Seiten – durch Torheit werden sie zu Fall gebracht. Leiter kennen ihre Ressourcen – wie können sie Krisen meistern?

5 1. Positive Eigenschaften eines Leiters

6 Acht Eigenschaften eines Leiters Lehren aus der Management-Theorie
Selbstsicherheit gesundes Selbstwertgefühl, innere Stabilität Intelligenz Zusammenhänge erkennen Kompetenz / Know-How Beziehungen, Zuhören und Gesprächsbereitschaft Lernbereitschaft / Neugier Mut, Vision und Leidenschaft Positive Haltung, Grosszügigkeit, Problemlösung Dienstbereitschaft, Einsatz und Initiative Verantwortung und Selbstdisziplin Nach John Maxwell: Charisma und Charakter

7 Charisma – was ist das? Selbstvertrauen / Lustvoll leben
Das Beste von andern erwarten und im andern sehen Andere ermutigen und ihnen zuhören Sich mitteilen und inspirierende Geschichten erzählen Billy Graham Obama Five qualities of „charismatic personalities“ Quelle: Here are 5 important qualities of a charismatic person – how many do you have? 1) Be Self Confident Like yourself. It’s much easier for others to like you if you like yourself. Be optimistic. Keep your glass half-full. Be enthusiastic. Be comfortable with who you are. Be consistent. Hold your own. Think Sheryl Sandberg – she holds her own in a male dominated geeky world and is still feminine. She knows herself and isn’t trying to be someone else. Don’t: Trot out all your issues. No one wants to be with Debbie Downer. We all have problems, but compartmentalize them, park them in a corner and bring them out for close friends and family. 2) Tell Great Stories “The universe is made of stories, not of atoms.” (Muriel Rukeyser, Poet and Activist) Speak with conviction. Use words like “I am sure” vs. tentative words like “I think, I hope and I feel.” Be tuned into humor. Self-deprecating humor can included – it’s ok to tell a story about an embarrassing moment. Be relevant. Know what’s happening in the world and around you. People want to be with people who are in the know. Don’t: Confuse humor with bad joke telling. Don’t self-deprecate yourself out of the conversation. Don’t put yourself down so much that it takes away from who you are. 3) Body Speak Be open and approachable. Gracious and graceful. Walk up to someone, smile, make eye contact, shake hands. Introduce yourself by saying your name, “Hi, I’m Ann, Ann Roberts.” That way people hear your voice twice. Own the room when you walk into it. Think President Obama when he walks to the podium. Get your own personal swagger. Don’t: Overdo it. When you smile, be authentic. If your smile is not in your eyes, people will know you’re faking it. 4) Make The Conversation About The Other Person Let the world revolve around the person you’re talking to. Make the person feel like they are the only person on the planet at that time. Immediately put others at ease and make them feel comfortable with you. Don’t: Let your ego drive the conversation. We all have egos. If your ego is in overdrive, check it at the door. 5) Be A Good listener You can’t remember everything, but remembering someone’s name is a biggie. Here’s a trick: When you are introduced to a person, immediately repeat their name. Example: “Amanda, it’s so nice to meet you.” Listen with interest. Pay attention. Engage. Be empathetic. Don’t: When you’re talking with someone at an event, do not check your cell phone or look around the room to see if someone more important is there. If you want to find someone more important, make the conversation brief and move on graciously. Are you charismatic? How many of the 5 qualities do you have? What about your co-workers, boss, spouse, friends and family – how many qualities do they have? Want to improve your charismatic rank? It’s never too late. Just cultivate it. Interesting question: Can someone be charismatic to me, but not to you? Examples: Steve Jobs, The Beatles etc. Winfrey Oprah Diana

8 2. Charakterschwächen und Versuchungen

9 Torheit bringt einen Menschen zu Fall
«die Toren verachten Weisheit und Zucht.» Ihr Handeln ist unstet, egal, wie viel Mühe sie sich geben «Die dunkle Triade» «Toxische Muster» «13 Dinge, die mental gesunde Menschen nicht machen sollten.»

10 Die dunkle Triade Narzissmus (Selbstbezogenheit)
Machtstreben (Machiavellismus) – Manipulation Psychopathie (gezielte Abwertung / Ausnutzung anderer trotz klarer gesetzlicher / moralischer Verbote)

11 Toxische Selbstbezogenheit / Narzissmus
Nur ich selbst bin mir wichtig Mein Glück und meine Zufriedenheit ist mein oberstes Ziel Meine Interessen, meine Wahrnehmung sind die Leitlinie Meine Aussenwirkung (Erfolg, Frauen, Autos etc.) sagt aus, wer ich bin.

12 Fallbeispiel Steve Jobs
War er begabt? Sicherlich!! Hatte er Charisma? (nicht sehr lustvoll – immer getrieben; hat er ermutigt? – nein, eher gefordert; hat er sich mitgeteilt? War eher verschlossen, aber ein hervorragender Kommunikator in der Öffentlichkeit. Getriebenheit führte zur emotionalen Ausbeutung seiner Mitarbeiter Zudem: massive Ablehnung seiner ersten Frau und Tochter Sein Schatten: Problem des Narzissmus Was Steve Jobs' Narcissism Justified? Is it ok to be a bully if you produce brilliant products? Post published by Gregg Henriques on Jan 20, 2012 in Theory of Knowledge SHARE TWEET In what has to be one of the most read and talked about biographies of all time, Walter Isaacson's book on Steve Jobs (link is external)reveals a fascinating portrait of a complex, gifted, and psychologically flawed character whose creative genius, enormous drive, and vision for infusing technology with art into an integrated functional whole ultimately led to revolutionizing six industries (personal computers, animated movies, phones, music, tablet computing, and digital publishing) and generating the most valuable company in the world (Apple). As someone who has a developed what feels like a revolutionary new theory of knowledge for the academy but one that has not had much in the way of larger impact, I felt a sense of awe, admiration, and a more than a touch of envy as Isaacson recounted the monumental influence Jobs has had on this planet. And yet as a clinical psychologist (and a secure, even-tempered family man), I felt more than a touch of condemnation of and pity for Jobs and his narcissistic personality structure. Along with some fellow Psych Today Bloggers, there is no doubt in my professional judgment that Jobs met criteria for a Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD). (link is external)He was preoccupied with his sense of importance and his brilliance, he consistently damaged others by exploiting and bullying them and could be completely unempathetic to their feelings, he was envious of other's attention, he was arrogant and haughty, and he was controlling and manipulative. Along with these overt characteristics, Jobs almost certainly had what many professional psychologists believe to be at the root of NPD, which is a fundamentally insecure sense of self. The idea is that people with NPD have a "pride-shame" split. At their emotional core, these individuals fear they are inferior and unlovable, and their constant displays of superiority and power are attempts to compensate for their underlying insecurities. The narcissistic split is comically brought to life in the character of Lord Farquaad in Shrek, an extremely short leader who builds a giant, phallic-like castle to compenstate. (link is external) Adopted at a young age, Jobs clearly had "abandonment issues." Moreover, an examination of his interpersonal relationships suggested a 'borderline' level of self-other functioning, meaning that his sense of himself in relationship to others was fragmented and poorly structured, and was fraught with emotionally charged conflicts that led to erratic, dramatic, and extreme relational swings. All of this suggested deep ambivalences about intimacy and dependency--and a fundamentally insecure sense of self. But here are the basic questions I have found myself struggling with as Isaacson took me along the Jobs life story. First, was his narcissism justified? After all, his capacity to see what needed to be done and get it done has been surpassed by few individuals. Second, do the accomplished ends justify the means? In 2008, when Fortune magazine (link is external) was on the point of running a damaging article about him, Jobs summoned their managing editor to Cupertino to demand he spike the piece: "He leaned into Serwer's face and asked, 'So, you've uncovered the fact that I'm an asshole. Why is that news?' (link is external)" In addition to revealing his controlling, bullying style, the question Jobs asks can be interpreted in (at least) two ways. One interpretation is that it is well-known that many visionary leaders are hard-driving, narcissistic bullies, so it should not be news when such a leader is confirmed to have this kind of style. The second interpretation is that Jobs should be defined by the products his company produces, not by the means by which he leads people to produce them. The iMac, iPod, iPad, etc. are revolutionary products--the means by which they emerged are irrelevant. End of story. Or is it? Jobs himself would initially have to say no. If, for example, the products were the result of stolen ideas, then that should clearly influence the consumer attitude in a negative way. Jobs' late life assault on the Android is clear about that. (link is external) Thus, there is some moral standard that Jobs felt should have a meaningful impact on the consumer's sense of the produce. But if the creative force behind the product is an a-hole? Does that matter? I am sure it did matter (and perhaps even does to this day) to the well-being of all the individuals that Jobs bullied, cajoled, shamed, and rejected. But how do we measure those values in relationship to the large scale impact of his products? I, for one, am not sure how to answer that question. But I do think it is a foundational one for how we structure our society, and I hope we have an open conversation about it.

13 Steve Jobs - Narzissmus
Der erfolgreichste Unternehmer der letzten 50 Jahre. Hat mit seinen Erfindungen die Welt der Kommunikation und des digitalen Arbeitens revolutioniert Sah sich als brilliant und wichtig Wertet andere ab / unfair Arrogant und hochmütig / unhöflich Kontrollierend und manipulativ Basis: eine tiefe Unsicherheit seines Selbstwertgefühls. Muss sich immer beweisen. Was Steve Jobs' Narcissism Justified? Is it ok to be a bully if you produce brilliant products? Post published by Gregg Henriques on Jan 20, 2012 in Theory of Knowledge In what has to be one of the most read and talked about biographies of all time, Walter Isaacson's book on Steve Jobs (link is external)reveals a fascinating portrait of a complex, gifted, and psychologically flawed character whose creative genius, enormous drive, and vision for infusing technology with art into an integrated functional whole ultimately led to revolutionizing six industries (personal computers, animated movies, phones, music, tablet computing, and digital publishing) and generating the most valuable company in the world (Apple). As someone who has a developed what feels like a revolutionary new theory of knowledge for the academy but one that has not had much in the way of larger impact, I felt a sense of awe, admiration, and a more than a touch of envy as Isaacson recounted the monumental influence Jobs has had on this planet. And yet as a clinical psychologist (and a secure, even-tempered family man), I felt more than a touch of condemnation of and pity for Jobs and his narcissistic personality structure. Along with some fellow Psych Today Bloggers, there is no doubt in my professional judgment that Jobs met criteria for a Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD). (link is external)He was preoccupied with his sense of importance and his brilliance, he consistently damaged others by exploiting and bullying them and could be completely unempathetic to their feelings, he was envious of other's attention, he was arrogant and haughty, and he was controlling and manipulative. Along with these overt characteristics, Jobs almost certainly had what many professional psychologists believe to be at the root of NPD, which is a fundamentally insecure sense of self. The idea is that people with NPD have a "pride-shame" split. At their emotional core, these individuals fear they are inferior and unlovable, and their constant displays of superiority and power are attempts to compensate for their underlying insecurities. The narcissistic split is comically brought to life in the character of Lord Farquaad in Shrek, an extremely short leader who builds a giant, phallic-like castle to compenstate. (link is external) Adopted at a young age, Jobs clearly had "abandonment issues." Moreover, an examination of his interpersonal relationships suggested a 'borderline' level of self-other functioning, meaning that his sense of himself in relationship to others was fragmented and poorly structured, and was fraught with emotionally charged conflicts that led to erratic, dramatic, and extreme relational swings. All of this suggested deep ambivalences about intimacy and dependency--and a fundamentally insecure sense of self. But here are the basic questions I have found myself struggling with as Isaacson took me along the Jobs life story. First, was his narcissism justified? After all, his capacity to see what needed to be done and get it done has been surpassed by few individuals. Second, do the accomplished ends justify the means? In 2008, when Fortune magazine (link is external) was on the point of running a damaging article about him, Jobs summoned their managing editor to Cupertino to demand he spike the piece: "He leaned into Serwer's face and asked, 'So, you've uncovered the fact that I'm an asshole. Why is that news?' (link is external)" In addition to revealing his controlling, bullying style, the question Jobs asks can be interpreted in (at least) two ways. One interpretation is that it is well-known that many visionary leaders are hard-driving, narcissistic bullies, so it should not be news when such a leader is confirmed to have this kind of style. The second interpretation is that Jobs should be defined by the products his company produces, not by the means by which he leads people to produce them. The iMac, iPod, iPad, etc. are revolutionary products--the means by which they emerged are irrelevant. End of story. Or is it? Jobs himself would initially have to say no. If, for example, the products were the result of stolen ideas, then that should clearly influence the consumer attitude in a negative way. Jobs' late life assault on the Android is clear about that. (link is external) Thus, there is some moral standard that Jobs felt should have a meaningful impact on the consumer's sense of the produce. But if the creative force behind the product is an a-hole? Does that matter? I am sure it did matter (and perhaps even does to this day) to the well-being of all the individuals that Jobs bullied, cajoled, shamed, and rejected. But how do we measure those values in relationship to the large scale impact of his products? I, for one, am not sure how to answer that question. But I do think it is a foundational one for how we structure our society, and I hope we have an open conversation about it. Spannungsfeld Stolz - Scham

14 Der Schatten „Um weise zu werden, musst du den wilden Hunden zuhören, die in deinem Keller bellen.“ (Friedrich Nietzsche) Was ist der Schatten (C.G. Jung) ? das Ungelebte, die eigenen unerfüllten Wünsche Abgründe und dunkle Bereiche, derer wir uns schämen Charakterdefizite, die das Gute zerstören

15 Christliche Formulierung (Bonhoeffer)
„Das Böse, Sündige, Gemeine ist übermächtig in uns, und wir bleiben in seinem Bann, solange wir leben – und wir würden am Guten, am Heiligen, an uns selbst und an Gott verzweifeln, wenn uns nicht das Wort gegeben wäre: Lass dir an meiner Gnade genügen, denn meine Kraft ist in den Schwachen mächtig (2 Korinther 12, 9).“ Quelle: Barcelona, Berlin, Amerika , DBW Band 10, Seite 509

16 Vier Bereiche der Versuchung
Macht Sex Geld

17 13 Dinge, die mental starke Leute nicht tun
Sie vergeuden keine Zeit mit Selbstmitleid Sie geben nicht andern die Macht über sich Sie scheuen sich nicht vor Veränderung Sie konzentrieren sich nicht auf Dinge, die sie nicht ändern können Sie wollen nicht allen gefallen Sie haben keine Angst ein kalkuliertes Risiko einzugehen Sie bleiben nicht in der Vergangenheit hängen Sie wiederholen nicht ständig die gleichen Fehler Sie sind nicht eifersüchtig auf den Erfolg anderer Leute Sie geben nach dem ersten Misserfolg nicht auf Sie fürchten sich nicht vor Zeiten des Alleinseins Sie meinen nicht, die Welt sei ihnen etwas schuldig Sie erwarten nicht sofortige Resultate

18 Gebet von Franz von Assisi
Herr, mach mich zu einem Werkzeug deines Friedens. Wo Hass herrscht, lass mich Liebe entfachen. Wo Beleidigung herrscht, lass mich Vergebung entfachen. Wo Zerstrittenheit herrscht, lass mich Einigkeit entfachen. Wo Irrtum herrscht, lass mich Wahrheit entfachen. Wo Zweifel herrscht, lass mich Glauben entfachen. Wo Verzweiflung herrscht, lass mich Hoffnung entfachen. Wo Finsternis herrscht, lass mich Dein Licht entfachen. Wo Kummer herrscht, lass mich Freude entfachen. O Herr, lass mich trachten: nicht, dass ich getröstet werde, sondern dass ich tröste, nicht, dass ich verstanden werde, sondern dass ich verstehe, nicht, dass ich geliebt werde, sondern dass ich liebe, denn wer gibt, der empfängt, wer sich selbst vergisst, der findet, wer verzeiht, dem wird verziehen, und wer stirbt, der erwacht zum ewigen Leben.

19 Unsere innere Haltung bestimmt auch unsere Resilienz
WEISHEIT ALS BRÜCKE Unsere innere Haltung bestimmt auch unsere Resilienz

20 Weisheit – einige Anregungen
Die Furcht des Herrn ist der Anfang der Weisheit! Sich einfühlen in andere Das Ganze sehen (Kontextualismus) Sich selbst nicht zu wichtig nehmen Ausgeglichenheit und Humor Nachhaltigkeit – Denken an die Zukunft Perspektivwechsel: Ich versetze mich bei einem Konflikt in die Rolle anderer Beteiligter. Kontextualismus: Zeitliche und thematische Verbindungen zwischen verschiedenen Lebensbereichen und -erfahrungen erkennen. – «Das ist meine neue Realität!» Ausgeglichenheit und Humor: Gefühle so kontrollieren, dass sie Denken, Handeln und Wohlbefinden nicht übermäßig stören. Selbstdistanz und Anspruchsrelativierung: Die Fähigkeit, eigene Interessen zurückzustellen, um ein höheres Ziel zu erreichen. Nachhaltigkeit: ein Verhalten, das kurzfristig vielleicht anstrengt, langfristig aber zum Ziel führt.

21 Neun Fragen zur Weisheit
Was bestimmt meine Beziehungen? Einfühlung / Zuhören ? Wie gehe ich mit den Dingen und Ereignissen um, die ich nicht verstehe? Urteilen / Verurteilen / Akzeptieren ? Spannungsfelder in mir selbst – wie gehe ich damit um? Was hilft mir, die Welt um mich herum einzuordnen? Was bestimmt mein Lesen, mein Hören, meinen Medienkonsum? 1. Welche Personen sind mir ein Vorbild an Weisheit? Was möchte ich von ihnen lernen? 2. Was bestimmt meine Beziehungen? Ist es mir ein Anliegen, mich bei Konflikten auch in die Beweggründe des andern einzufühlen? Nehme ich mir Zeit für den Austausch mit andern Menschen? 3. Wie gehe ich mit den Dingen und Ereignissen um, die ich nicht verstehe? Urteile und verurteile ich, oder suche ich zu verstehen? Kann ich akzeptieren, dass ich Manches nicht verstehe? 4. Wie gehe ich mit den Spannungsfeldern in mir selbst um? Kann ich meinen Schatten annehmen und kenne ich Wege, meine Schwächen zu bewältigen? 5. Was hilft mir, die Welt um mich herum einzuordnen? Was bestimmt mein Lesen, mein Hören, meinen Medienkonsum? Oberflächliche News, Zeitgeist, Trends und Trash – oder Texte, die mich zum Nachdenken anregen? Bin ich lernbereit und offen für Neues? 6. Was bestimmt meine Prioritäten? Lasse ich mich von Alltagspflichten und digitalen Taktgebern hetzen oder nehme ich mir Zeit für das, was mir wirklich wichtig ist? 7. Welche Überlegungen leiten mich bei wichtigen Entscheiden? Berücksichtige ich, wie sie sich auf die Menschen in meinem Umfeld auswirken? Und welches sind die Folgen auf lange Sicht (Nachhaltigkeit)? 8. Was hilft mir, mich nicht zu sehr um meine eigenen Probleme zu drehen? Bin ich mir meiner Vergänglichkeit bewusst? Wie kann ich Bescheidenheit zeigen und doch innerlich um meinen Wert und meine Wurzeln wissen? 9. Welcher Kompass bestimmt mein Handeln? Welche Werte lebe ich im Alltag? Wie kann ich andern Raum geben? Auf welche Weise suche ich konkret das Wohl der Menschen und der Welt? 10. Wie steht es mit meiner Balance von Aktivität und Stille? Gibt es Momente, in denen ich innehalte und auf die verborgene Stimme höre? Lasse ich mich berühren von Schönheit in Musik, Kunst und Natur? Welche Erfahrungen geben mir das Gefühl der Verbundenheit mit Gott?

22 Fragen zur Weisheit Was bestimmt meine Prioritäten?
Alltagspflichten / digitale Taktgeber / Nebensächlichkeiten ? Welche Überlegungen leiten mich bei wichtigen Entscheiden? Eigener Erfolg / Andere Menschen / Nachhaltigkeit ? Was hilft mir, mich nicht zu sehr um meine eigenen Probleme zu drehen? Bescheidenheit / Vergänglichkeit / Selbstwert in Gott ruhend Mein Kompass: Welche Werte lebe ich im Alltag? Auf welche Weise suche ich konkret das Wohl der Menschen und der Welt? Balance von Aktivität und Stille? Stille Momente mit Gott? Lasse ich mich berühren von Schönheit in Musik, Kunst und Natur? 1. Welche Personen sind mir ein Vorbild an Weisheit? Was möchte ich von ihnen lernen? 2. Was bestimmt meine Beziehungen? Ist es mir ein Anliegen, mich bei Konflikten auch in die Beweggründe des andern einzufühlen? Nehme ich mir Zeit für den Austausch mit andern Menschen? 3. Wie gehe ich mit den Dingen und Ereignissen um, die ich nicht verstehe? Urteile und verurteile ich, oder suche ich zu verstehen? Kann ich akzeptieren, dass ich Manches nicht verstehe? 4. Wie gehe ich mit den Spannungsfeldern in mir selbst um? Kann ich meinen Schatten annehmen und kenne ich Wege, meine Schwächen zu bewältigen? 5. Was hilft mir, die Welt um mich herum einzuordnen? Was bestimmt mein Lesen, mein Hören, meinen Medienkonsum? Oberflächliche News, Zeitgeist, Trends und Trash – oder Texte, die mich zum Nachdenken anregen? Bin ich lernbereit und offen für Neues? 6. Was bestimmt meine Prioritäten? Lasse ich mich von Alltagspflichten und digitalen Taktgebern hetzen oder nehme ich mir Zeit für das, was mir wirklich wichtig ist? 7. Welche Überlegungen leiten mich bei wichtigen Entscheiden? Berücksichtige ich, wie sie sich auf die Menschen in meinem Umfeld auswirken? Und welches sind die Folgen auf lange Sicht (Nachhaltigkeit)? 8. Was hilft mir, mich nicht zu sehr um meine eigenen Probleme zu drehen? Bin ich mir meiner Vergänglichkeit bewusst? Wie kann ich Bescheidenheit zeigen und doch innerlich um meinen Wert und meine Wurzeln wissen? 9. Welcher Kompass bestimmt mein Handeln? Welche Werte lebe ich im Alltag? Wie kann ich andern Raum geben? Auf welche Weise suche ich konkret das Wohl der Menschen und der Welt? 10. Wie steht es mit meiner Balance von Aktivität und Stille? Gibt es Momente, in denen ich innehalte und auf die verborgene Stimme höre? Lasse ich mich berühren von Schönheit in Musik, Kunst und Natur? Welche Erfahrungen geben mir das Gefühl der Verbundenheit mit Gott?

23 Schönheit entsteht auch aus knorrigem Holz
Wir sind geformt und geprägt durch unsere Erfahrungen wie die Bäume, deren Holz einst einer Geige ihren Klang geben. «Abhölzigkeiten» Manche haben sich schon früh gebildet, oder sind genetisch angelegt. «Verkrümmungen» sind in Stürmen, Eis und Hagel geworden und lassen sich nicht rückgängig machen. Sie gehören zu unserem Leben. Vgl. Martin Schleske: Der Klang, S. 55 ff Barocke Baupläne aus Schleske, S. 350 Der Münchner Geigenbauer Martin Schleske beschreibt eindringlich seine Arbeit mit dem Holz, aus dem eine Geige entsteht. Sie wird ihm zum Gleichnis für den Menschen. Das ursprünglich gewachsene Holz in seinen «Abhölzigkeiten» vergleicht er mit den schicksalshaft verlaufenden Lebenslinien der menschlichen Existenz. Wir alle sind durch die Erfahrungen unseres Lebens geformt und geprägt, wie die Bäume, deren Holz einst einer Geige ihren Klang geben. Manche «Abhölzigkeiten» haben sich schon früh in unserem «Faserverlauf» des Lebens gebildet, ja sie sind vielleicht schon genetisch angelegt. Andere «Verkrümmungen» sind im rauen Wechselspiel von Stürmen, Eis und Hagel ganz allmählich gewachsen und lassen sich nicht mehr rückgängig machen, sie gehören zu unserem Leben. Geigenbauer Martin Schleske «Der Klang»

24 Charakter – Ursprung und Chance
«Weisheit wird dem Leben gerecht. Sie achtet das Gewordene und sieht das Werdende in seinen Möglichkeiten.» Vgl. Martin Schleske: Der Klang, S. 55 ff Barocke Baupläne aus Schleske, S. 350

25 Der gesunde Leiter hat auch einen Bezug zur Ewigkeit

26 Herr lehre uns bedenken …

27 The God on the mountain is still God in the valley
Lynda Randle The God on the mountain is still God in the valley YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RCTl4tUYIAg


Herunterladen ppt "PY 04 Gesunder Charakter Dr. med. Samuel Pfeifer, Riehen"

Ähnliche Präsentationen


Google-Anzeigen