Die Präsentation wird geladen. Bitte warten

Die Präsentation wird geladen. Bitte warten

Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Norbert K. Semmer University of Bern Psychology of Work and Organizations 1 Geneva September 6, 2013.

Ähnliche Präsentationen


Präsentation zum Thema: "Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Norbert K. Semmer University of Bern Psychology of Work and Organizations 1 Geneva September 6, 2013."—  Präsentation transkript:

1 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Norbert K. Semmer University of Bern Psychology of Work and Organizations 1 Geneva September 6, 2013 Swisstransfusion 2013

2 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Human error Technical Failure (latent Errors)) Human rescue acts Technical corrections Success? Impaired Quality Injury Accident 2 Result OK

3 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer TO ERR IS HUMAN… BUT: TAKE CARE NOT TO BE CAUGHT! 3

4 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Three aspects: 1.cognitive 2.motivational 3.social 4

5 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer I. The cognitive aspect Attention, Routine, Slips/Lapses 5

6 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 6 Mistakes Erroneous judgment Action is intended Immediate result is intended Consequences of action not intended Action consciously controlled Action not carried out as intended Immediate result not intended No, or only partial, conscious control Slips / Lapses False execution of action Error Types Examples: Diagnosis wrong Dose wrongly calculated Classic routine errors. Examples: Tube not securely fastened Administering drug that looks similar

7 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 7 Reduced attention is what makes routine efficient: It frees mental capacity! Slips and Lapses: Routine actions We especially revert to routine under stress when fatigued Need less conscious attention Need less mental capacity Cannot be controlled easily Are automatically triggered by (seemingly) appropriate situations – sometimes after a very long time!

8 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 8 To look more intensely means to see more But: Attention is selective Attention: Typical misconceptons Attention can be consciously controlled only partly (e.g., distraction!) only for a limited time (fatigue) True (uninterrupted) vigilance is possible only for about 30 to 45 minutes The often heard conclusion: If he only had been more attentive often misses the point Check ergonomics (e.g., similar appearance of drugs) Check for fatigue (working time; breaks) Check for interruptions and distractions

9 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 9 not everything simplified sometimes more than there is We go unnoticed be ignored Things that are unremarkable unexpected not fitting be seen receive more weight be invented Things that stand out are expected see hear notice are likely to Perception as construction

10 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 10 nicht alles vereinfacht manchmal mehr als da ist Wir übersehen Unauffälliges Unerwartetes Unpassendas gesehen gewichtet erfunden Auffallendes Passendes Erwartetes sehen hören merken wird oft wird Wahrnehmung als Konstruktion

11 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 11 Availability: what comes to mind easily Frequency: What we have seen / experienced often Vividness: What has impressed us Representativity: Similarity in core characteristics Influences on our judgment: Heuristics Like routine: Heuristics make us efficient, and they often work well. But they also contain risks In many situations, we do not systematically gather and weight the evidence Rather, we take mental shortcuts Tropical illlness, symptoms similar to a flu Diagnosis flu not improbable Mistakes

12 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Making jugdments Processing information affected by what we expect 12 Making judgments affected by heuristics Search for confirming information (Confirmation Bias) Information that does not fit often is ignored explained away Efficient Mostly correct Make at least one mental loop: Is there anything that runs counter to my conclusion? Thats where it gets dangerous misperceived

13 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Confirmation Bias and medical diagnosis: an exmple from a simulator study 20 Groups à 3 MDs > Patient is handed over > Diagnosis: Pneumonia > Treated with penicillin > MD who hands over reports unsuccessful attempt to insert a subclavian catheter 13 > Patient ist allergic to penicillin > Correct diagnosis anaphylactic schock > Type of symptoms + unsuccessful insertion of catheter: > Suggest tension pneumothorax > Lung sounds are objectively identical > In 10 of 20 Teams at least on MD «hears« a difference > Correct diagnosis: 6 groups / with help: 8 / No: 6 Tschan, F., Semmer, N. K., Gurtner, A., Bizzari, L., Spychiger, M., Breuer, M., & Marsch, S. U. (2009). Explicit reasoning, confirmation bias, and illusory transactive memory: Predicting diagnostic accuracy in medical emergency driven teams in a simulator setting. Small Group Research, 40,

14 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Confirmation Bias bei medizinischen Diagnosen: ein Beispiel aus einer Simulator-Studie 20 Gruppen à 3 ÄrtzInnen > Patient wird übergeben > Diagnose: Lungenentzündung > wird mit Penicillin behandelt > Übergebender Arzt berichtet von erfolglosem ZVK 14 > Patient ist allergisch auf Penicillin > Korrekte Diagnose anaphylaktischer Schock > Hinweis auf ZVK + Art der Symptome: > Naheliegende Diagnose Pneumothorax > Lungengeräusche sind objektiv identisch > In 10 von 20 Teams «hört» mindestens ein Mitglied Unterschiede > Richtige Diagnose: 6 Gruppen / mit Hilfe: 8 / Nein: 6 Tschan, F., Semmer, N. K., Gurtner, A., Bizzari, L., Spychiger, M., Breuer, M., & Marsch, S. U. (2009). Explicit reasoning, confirmation bias, and illusory transactive memory: Predicting diagnostic accuracy in medical emergency driven teams in a simulator setting. Small Group Research, 40,

15 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Signs of confirmation bias: Illusions and contagious illusions > Illusions: Auscultation: sound is always present, patient gets more obstructive, but there are no changes in volume over time – In five groups, at least one physician changes his/her mind about the symmetry / volume of the breathing sound Needle decompression: if the group treats a pneumothorax, no air is released through the needle in the dummy – But: One group applies needle decompression – and one physician states hearing the air released > Contagious illusions – in two groups, one physician changed his mind about the breathing sounds after being influenced by other group member

16 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 16 Wir underestimate risks......if we have successfully dealt with them frequently...if they are not vivid Personal Risk-Estimation frequently is lower than risk-estimation in general! (Illusion olf invulnerabiity) Estimation of Risk

17 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Risikoeinschätzung vo 33 Tätigkeiten im Bergwerk positiv = Überschätzung / negativ = Unterschätzung Nach: Musahl, H.-P. (1997). Gefahrenkognition: Theoretische Annäherungen, empirische Befunde und Anwendungsbezüge zur subjektiven Gefahrenkenntnis. Heidelberg: Asanger. [Tab. 44; S. 276] Z-Wert-Differenz Tätigkeiten Diese vier Tätigkeiten vereinen 50.6% der Unfälle auf sich! 17 Die meisten Tätigkeiten werden recht realistisch eingeschätzt ABER:

18 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Risk estimation for 33 activities in a coal mine positive = overstimated / negative = underestimated After: Musahl, H.-P. (1997). Gefahrenkognition: Theoretische Annäherungen, empirische Befunde und Anwendungsbezüge zur subjektiven Gefahrenkenntnis (Perception of danger: Theoretical approaches, empirical findings, and application for subjective risk estimation). Heidelberg: Asanger. [Tab. 44; S. 276] Difference (standardized ) Activities These four activities are involved in 50.6% of all accidents! 18 Most activities are estimated realistically However:

19 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 19 Estimating risks: I versus others (glass production) Whats the risk of an injury?... for you … for your colleagues Rare and heavy: e.g. crushing fingers Frequent but minor e.g., splint in finger Spitzenstetter, F (2006).Optimisme comparatif dans le milieu professionnel: Linfluence de la fréquence et de la gravité sur la perception des risques daccient du travail. Psychologie du travail es des organisations, 12, n = 45 n = 37

20 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 20 Risikoeinschätzung: Ich und die anderen Wie hoch ist das Risko, einen Unfall zu erleiden? (...für Sie / für eine Kollegin / einen Kollegen) Betrieb: Glasfabrikation. ca. 2/3 Frauen Selten und schwer: Finger quetschen Häufig und leicht Splitter im Finger Spitzenstetter, F (2006).Optimisme comparatif dans le milieu professionnel: Linfluence de la fréquence et de la gravité sur la perception des risques daccient du travail. Psychologie du travail es des organisations, 12, n = 45 n = 37

21 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Generisches Fehler-Modellierungs-System (GEMS) FÄHIGKEITSBASIERTE EBENE (Schnitzer und Patzer) OK? Routinehandlungen in einer vertrauten Umgebung Aufmerksamkeits-Checks für den Fortgang der Handlung ZIELZUSTAND JA NEIN REGELBASIERTE EBENE (regelbasierte Fehler) Problem Beachte lokale Zustandsinformation IST DAS MUSTER VERTRAUT? IST DAS PROBLEM GELÖST? NEIN Wende gespeicherte Regel an WENN (Situation) DANN (Handlung) NEIN JA WISSENSBASIERTE EBENE (wissensbasierte Fehler) Finde Analogie auf höherer Ebene Zurück zum mentalen Modell des Problemraums. Analysiere die abstrakteren Beziehungen zw. Struktur und Funktion. KEINE GEFUNDEN Leite Diagnose ab und formuliere Korrekturhandlungen. Wende die Handlungen an. Betrachte das Ergebnis,... etc. 21

22 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 22 Cognitive aspects: Conclusions > Judgment is often made intuitively quickly! > Thats often successful – but not always! > We often dont call our judgments into question (confirmation bias) > Routine is indispensable and increases efficiency > BUT: Routine implies less conscious control of actions > Especially under stress and fatigue We cannot constantly call everyhing into question But we can ask at least ONCE: Is there any information that runs counter to my judgment? Consider: Workingtime / breaks / fatigue Ergonomics Interruptions / distractions Ensuring controls (e.g, checklists)

23 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 23 Kognitive Aspekte: Fazit > Meinungsbildung erfolgt oft intuitiv und schnell – und zwar oft erfolgreich! > Oft erfolgreich heisst auch: Nicht immer erfolgreich! > Der Confirmation Bias verhindert oft, dass wir einmal gefasste Meinungen in Frage stellen > Routinehandlungen sind unerlässlich und steigern die Effizienz > ABER: Sie laufen mit wenig bewusster Aufmerksamkeit und Kontrolle > Dies vor allem bei hoher Beanspruchung/Stress und Ermüdung Wir können nicht immer alles in Frage stellen Aber wir können uns EINMAL fragen: Gibt es Informationen, die meiner Meinung widersprechen? Bei Anzeichen eigener Hektik: Bewusst noch einmal kontrollieren!

24 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 24 Special problem: Stress, attention, and team coordination > Team work implies: > Each member has his/her specific task > At the same time: team coordination must be ensured > Stress often impairs the team perspective People focus on ONE task Two tasks: Individual task Team-coordination Example from our simulator studies (cardiac arrest scenario): > Three MDs try to get the defibrillator going > They focus exclusively on the defibrillator > No one continues heart massage… Tschan, F., Vetterli,M., Semmer, N. K., Hunziker, S., & Marsch, S. C. U. (2011). Activities during interruptions in cardiopulmonary resuscitation: A simulator study. Resuscitation, 82,

25 Motivational aspects: Violation of rules

26 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer University of Berne Wahrnehmung und Bewertung von Sicherheitsproblemen Situation Sicherheits- massnahme Situations- bewertung Situations- definition Sicherheit relevant? Ja Nein keine Sicherheits- massnahme Sicherheit bedroht? Ja

27 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Expectancy-Value Theory BehaviorValueExpectancy Motivation = expectancy x Value How probable are the consequences? How desirable are the consequences? 27 desirable results Should I do that? undesirable results > Not that we calculate our motivation in a strict mathematical sense > But: Intuitively we consider possible consequences, their probability, and their desirability

28 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Erwartungs x Wert-Theorie: Grundelemente HandlungBewertungErwartung Motivation = Wert x Erwartung Wie wahrscheinlich sind die Ergebnisse? Wie wünschenswert sind die Ergebnisse? 28 wünschenswerte Ergebnisse Soll ich das tun? nicht wünschenswerte Ergebnisse > Wir berechnen nicht unsere Motivation streng mathematisch > Aber: Intuitiv und grob > kalkulieren wir mögliche Folgen (sehr) wahrscheinlich - (sehr) unwahrscheinlich) > und ihre Bewertung (sehr) gut / neutral / (sehr) schlecht

29 A fictituous example…

30 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 30 Hygiene: The value-component Minimize risk Annoying In favor of desinfecting Minimzing risk=+ 10 annoying=- 4 Time consuming=- 3 Σ = 3 Time consuming (the next task is waiting) - 3 Desinfect hands on the way to the next patient?

31 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 31 > Eigentlich sind die drei Minuten ja etwas übertrieben > Ich wasche mich ja besonders gründlich > Ich habe doch gerade mit Sterilium… > Ich habe ja noch Handschuhe an… > Mir ist in dieser Hinsicht doch noch nie etwas passiert… Hygiene: Der Erwartungs-Aspekt

32 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 32 > Arent these rules a bit disproportional? > All I want to do is quickly look at … > If the boss doesnt do it, the risk cant be that great… > After all, the patient has no open wounds… > I dont want to touch the patient anyway… > I have never had any problems with hygiene… > We dont have multi-resistant germs here… Hygiene: The expectancy component How great is the risk if I dont desinfect? Desinfecting will minimize the perceived risk only minimally

33 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 33 Minimize risk Annoying In favor of desinfecting Time consuming (the next task is waiting) - 3 Desinfect hands on the way to the next patient? Hygiene: Value AND expectancy Minmizing risk= 0.10 * + 10 = 1 annoying=1 * - 4 =- 4 time consuming=1 * -3 =- 3 Σ = - 6 Against

34 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 34 Hände Waschen auf dem Weg zum nächsten Patienten? Risiko minimieren nervt Spricht für Desinfizieren Risikominimierung=0.10 * + 10 = 1 nervig=1 * - 4 =- 4 Zeitverlust=1 * -3 =- 3 Σ = 6 Kostet Zeit ( die nächste Aufgabe wartet) GEGEN Hygiene: Value AND expectancy

35 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 35 SICHERHEITS-KALKÜL Nochmals prüfen? Risiko minimieren längerer Stillstand der Anlage Spricht für Prüfen Risikominimierung=+ 10 längerer Stillstand=- 5 Σ = 5

36 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 36 SICHERHEITS-KALKÜL Nochmals prüfen? Risiko minimieren längerer Stillstand der Anlage Risikominimierung=0.05* + 10 =+ 0.5 längerer Stillstand=1* - 5 =- 5 Σ = =- 4.5 Spricht für Prüfen GEGEN

37 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 37 SICHERHEITS-KALKÜL III Nochmals prüfen? Kritik durch Vorgesetzte als Angsthase dastehen Risiko minimieren längerer Stillstand der Anlage

38 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 38 SICHERHEITS-KALKÜL Termin wird eingehalten Enge Termin- vorgabe Schneller arbeiten Riskanter arbeiten Lob vom Chef Lob für riskantes Arbeiten

39 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 39 Erwartungs-Wert-Theorien: Fallstricke und Merkpunkte 1. Nicht nur Werte, auch Wahrscheinlichkeiten (Erwartungen) einbeziehen 2. Auf Verhalten achten, nicht nur auf Folgen Man kann oft über lange Zeit Regeln missachten, ohne dass etwas passiert! 3. Handeln kann im Widerspruch zu wichtigen Werten stehen Wer Hyiene – Vorschriften missachtet, dem kann Hygiene trotzdem wichtig sein!

40 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 40 Wert-Erwartungstheorien: Fallstricke und Merkpunkte 1. Nicht nur Werte, auch Wahrscheinlichkeiten (Erwartungen) einbeziehen Wahrscheinlichkeiten bieten meist mehr Inter- ventionsmöglichkeiten als Werte 2. Auf Verhalten achten, nicht nur auf Folgen 3. Stabilität der Motivation nicht überschätzen 4. Handeln kann im Widerspruch zu wichtigen Werten stehen Gesamt-Kalkül beachten!

41 Erwartungs-Wert Theorien: Welche Konsequenzen sind wichtig? 1. Auf negative Konsequenzen achten: Sind häufig durchschlagend 2. Auf kurzfristige Konsequenzen achten 3. Mehrere Konsequenzen einbeziehen, nicht nach einer aufhören 4. Verborgene Konsequenzen suchen (Gesichtsverlust)

42 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Consequences of safe behavior > delayed > defined by something not happening > therefore not visible (no infections) > associated with very small risks > which appear even smaller because we frequently experience that violations have no serious consequences 42 > Immediate > annoying > cumbersome > time consuming Positive consequences are often Negative consequences are often Expectancy component often very small Expectancy component often high Expectancies can induce us to do things that contradict our values

43 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Conclusions Solution I: * catheter-related blood stream infections (CR-BSI) Pronovost, P.J., & Holzmueller, C.G. (2004). Partnering for quality. Journal of Critical Care, 19, All measures are promising that make safe behavior less cumbersome Example Pronovost I Problem: > Too many infections of a specific kind in a hospital * > Hygiene identified as cause Doctors had to collect supplies from 9 (!) different places Analysing the course of events: Construing a storage cart: Everything in one place

44 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Conclusions Analysing the course of events: Solution I: * catheter-related blood stream infections (CR-BSI) Pronovost, P.J., & Holzmueller, C.G. (2004). Partnering for quality. Journal of Critical Care, 19, All measures are promising that make safe behavior less cumbersome Example Pronovost I Problem: > Too many infections of a specific kind in a hospital * > Hygiene identified as cause Doctors have to collect material from 9 (!) different places Construing a cart: Everything at one place

45 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Einhalten von Hygienevorschriften > Ärzte müssen Material an 9 verschiedenen Stellen holen > Lösung: Materialwagen. > Arbeitsgestalterischer Aspekt: Einfach umsetzbar Sozialer Aspekt: Vorschlag: Krankenschwestern füllen Checkliste aus Sollen die Prozedur nötigenfalls unterbrechen und den Arzt / die Ärztin auf die Verletzung von Vorschriften hinweisen Mühsame – aber erfolgreiche – Umsetzung Rückgang der entsprechenden Infektionen um 96% * catheter-related blood stream infections (CR-BSI) Pronovost, P.J., & Holzmueller, C.G. (2004). Partnering for quality. Journal of Critical Care, 19, Problem: Zu viele Infektionen einer bestimmten Art im Spital* – Hygiene als Ursache ermittelt 45

46 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 46 Motivationale Aspects: Fazit > Bei vielen wünschenswerten Handlungen ist nicht die Bewertung das Problem: Alle finden Hygiene wichtig! > Das Problem liegt in der Einschätzung der Wahrscheinlichkeit (Erwartung: Trägt das auch zu mehr Sicherheit bei?) Betonung der Wichtigkeit bringt daher nicht viel. > Sicherheitsgerechtes Handeln ist oft umständlich, lästig und zeitaufwendig Sicherheitsgerechtes Handeln so einfach wie möglich machen > Andere positive Erwartungen sind oft gering: Wer sieht schon, dass ich hygienegerecht handle? Sicherheitsgerechtes Handeln (Handlungen, nicht Ergebnisse!) müssen mehr mit positiven Konsequenzen verbunden werden

47 Social Aspects

48 Communication

49 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 49 Sources of error in communication My message will be recieved will be understood as intended will be on everybodys mind for a long time is accepted if no-one raises objections

50 Feedback

51 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Förderung sicheren Handelns Ende Intervention Verpackung Zubereitung Nach Komaki, J.L., Barwick, K.D., & Scott, L.R. (1978). A behavioral approach to occupational safety: Pinpointing and reinforcing safe performance in a food manufacturing plant. Journal of Applied Psychology, 63, Grundlinie Intervention Kontext: Lebensmittelindustrie Intervention: Rückmeldung über % sicher ausgeführter Verrichtungen 51

52 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Improving safe behavior through feedback Ende Intervention 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 0 Nach Komaki, J. L., Barwick, K. D., & Scott, L. R. (1978). A behavioral approach to occupational safety: Pinpointing and reinforcing safe performance in a food manufacturing plant. Journal of Applied Psychology, 63, Baseline Intervention Food production (Example: Packaging) 52 Procedure: 1. Together with employees: Make list of behaviors that often are not carried out according to safety rules 2. Students observe working behavior 3. Intervention: Poster on wall: % safe behaviors from day before StartEnd

53 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 53 Zohar et al.: Making feedback permanent Zohar, D. (2002). Modifying supervisory practices to Improve Subunit Safety: A leadership-based intervention model. Journal of Applied Psychology, 87, Problem: > Feedback about safe behavior works. > But: It has to be given constantly Approach: Make it a permanent part of daily discussions Intervention: > Training supervisors: How to give feedback about safe behavior > Interviewing workers: How often has your supervisor talked to you about safe behavior? > Feedback of data to supervisors (about teams, not individuals) > Superiors at level 2 are informed how often superiors at levels 1 have talked to their workers about safe behavior > Level 2 superiors > discuss this information during appraisal interviews > take it into account for their performance evaluation

54 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Making feedback permanent 54 Workers Superiors Level I Superiors Level II receive feedback about how often they have talked to their workers about safe behavior (referring to teams, not to individuals) Talk about this information in appraisal interviews Take it into account for performance evaluation Clear Effects*: 1.More ear protection worn 2.Fewer injuries Maintained after 5 months Combined with training the following intervention is established * as compared to a control groups Zohar, D. (2002). Modifying supervisory practices to improve subunit safety: A leadership-based intervention model. Journal of Applied Psychology, 87, are interviewed about how often their superior has talked to them about safe behavior Receive feedback about how often superiors at level 1 have talked with their people about safe behavior

55 Shared convictions

56 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 56 Unquestioned Convictions Certain safety rules are important / not so important for safety Admitting mistakes is appreciated /not appreciated The boss reacts in an irritated / accepting way if called at night, even if the situation turns out not to be so bad Ones intuition can be trusted more than specific gauges and monitors Management gives safety priority over productivity Certain behaviors are safe or risky

57 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 57 Subjektive Risikoeinschätzung und tatsächliches Risiko im Bergbau (33 Tätigkeiten) Nach: Musahl, H.-P. (1997). Gefahrenkognition: Theoretische Annäherungen, empirische Befunde und Anwendungsbezüge zur subjektiven Gefahrenkenntnis. Heidelberg: Asanger. [Tab. 44; S. 276] Z-Wert-Differenz Tätigkeiten Diese vier Tätigkeiten vereinen 50.6% der Unfälle auf sich! ÜberschätzungRealistisch Unterschätzung

58 Social Norms Social consequences of behavior that does, or does not, conform to safety rules

59 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 59 NORMS Team Safety Avoid conflict Be competent Performance/ Production Dont tell on others Keep out of others domain Quality Respect rules Dont appear anxious

60 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 60 Violating social norms > Violating social norms frequently is punished > e.g., > by critizising > by ridiculing > by social exclusion > Expecting (dis-)approval influences the expectency-value calculation > creates expectancies (they will laugh about me) > These expectancies are associated with desirability > being laughted about is unpleasant; > being acknowlegded as competent is pleasant

61 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 61 Social Norms: Hierarchy Sometimes we ask too few questions and insist (too) litte especially, if the others – react in an irritated way – are hierarchically higher – might think of us as incompetent Typical example: Co-Pilot notices pilot error does not say it says it, but not loud enough does not insist if pilot reacts defensively

62 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Dangerous instructions A nurse gets a call from a medical doctor: She is to administer a drug to a patient > The nurse does not know the doctor; he is not on any list of hospital personnel > The drug has to be obtained from the hospital pharmacy > The dose is clearly too high Of 22 nurses, 21 would have given the drug Follow-up study: Of 18 nurses, 9 would have given the drug Hofling, C.K., Brotzman, E., Dalrymple, S., Graves, N., and Pierce, C. M. (1966). An experimental study of nurse- physician relationships. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 143, Rank, S.G. & Jacobson, C.K. (1977). Hospital nurses compliance wit medication overdose orders: A failure to replicate. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 17,

63 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Gefährliche Anweisungen Eine Krankenschwester bekommt einen Anruf von einem Arzt: Patient X soll ein Medikament bekommen > Der Arzt war ihr nicht bekannt, stand auf keiner Liste des Spitals > Das Medikament musste in der Spitalapotheke besorgt werden > Die Dosierung war erkennbar zu hoch 21 von 22 Krankenschwestern hätten das Medikament verabreicht Nachfolgeuntersuchung: 9 von 18 Krankenschwestern hätten das Medikament verabreicht Hofling, C.K., Brotzman, E., Dalrymple, S., Graves, N., and Pierce, C. M. (1966). An experimental study of nurse- physician relationships. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 143, Rank, S.G. & Jacobson, C.K. (1977). Hospital nurses compliance wit medication overdose orders: A failure to replicate. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 17,

64 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Making feedback permanent: Example II Solution I: Cart for material (see above) Soluation part Teil II: The social aspect * catheter-related blood stream infections (CR-BSI) Pronovost, P.J., & Holzmueller, C.G. (2004). Partnering for quality. Journal of Critical Care, 19, Problem: Too many infections due to insufficient hygiene 64 Proposition: Nurses observe behavior of MDs fills in checklist If necessary: interrupts and reminds the MD of the hygiene rules Implementation: Cumbersome: long discussions; much resistance But: Finally accepted Result: Infections reduced by 96%

65 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 65 Admitting mistakes: Calculating expectancies What happens if I report it? - I lose face - Many will say: This should not have happend - Many will say: This would not have happened to me + I am honest What happens if I dont report it? - If I am caught, I lose even more face + If I am not caught, my reputation remains good + If I report it, I have to go through a lot of bureaucracy - I am not honest I have made a mistake – should I report it? Expectancy-value calculation: If there is a chance to cover it up, thats often worthwhile Frequently there are more positive than negative consequences when one does not report the mistake

66 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 66 Mistakes in hindsight In hindsight people tend to think: That result was to be expected (Hindsight-Bias) We tend to see causes - too much within the person: he did not pay enough attention ; she was not careful enough - too little in the situation: he was distracted ; the situation appeard harmless This tendency is especially strong when we are dealing with other peoples behavior: He did not pay attention – I was distracted Hindsight bias fosters blaming!

67 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 67 From outside and in hindsight Mistakes look more avoidable (and thus: more culpable) Hindsight-Bias

68 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Schlussfolgerungen Analyse der Abläufe: Ärzte müssen Material an 9 (!) verschiedenen Stellen holen Lösung I: Materialwagen: Alles am gleichen Ort * catheter-related blood stream infections (CR-BSI) Pronovost, P.J., & Holzmueller, C.G. (2004). Partnering for quality. Journal of Critical Care, 19, Alle Massnahmen sind vielversprechend, die sicheres Handeln weniger umständlich machen Beispiel Pronovost I Problem: > Zu viele Infektionen einer bestimmten Art im Spital * > Hygiene als Ursache ermittelt

69 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Safety culture / error culture Mistakes often are a taboo associated with blame an attack on ones Ego > It therefore is difficult to discuss mistakes openly 69 But: Mitstakes can never fully avoided > We therefore have to expect mistakes Regard mistakes as normal Discuss mistakes openly; not primarily by blaming Which does not imply that acts of gross negligence should be accepted

70 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 70 > An open, trustful climate > is the best precondition > for discussing mistakes openly > Open discussion about mistakes 1. helps to avoid mistakes 2. And – since mistakes can never be fully avoided: > helps to detect mistakes early > and to prevent grave consequences Safety culture / error culture Error management is as important as error prevention

71 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 71 Defense in depth Technical but also human The Swiss Cheese Reason, J. (2000). Human error: models and management. British Medical Journal, 320,

72 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Human error Technical Failure (latent Errors) Human rescue acts Technical corrections Success? Impaired Quality Injury Accident 72 Result OK

73 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 73 Success? Result OK Grave conse- quences + - Human error Human rescue acts Humans are not only the weak points... but also often the ones who prevent catastrophes > Diese Ressourcen gilt es zu stärken > Wir haben schon Fortschritte gemacht > Darauf müssen wir aufbauen > Auch wenn gilt: Der Fortschritt ist eine Schnecke!

74 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 74 Human error Technical Failure (latent Errors) Human rescue acts Technical corrections Success? Result OK Grave conse- quences + - Human error Human rescue acts Humans are not only the weak points... but also often the ones who prevent catastrophes > These human resources have to be strenghened!

75 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 75 Menschliche Fehlhandlungen Technisches Versagen Menschliche Korrektur- handlungen Technische Korrekturen Erfolg? Ergebnis OK Qualitäts- Mangel/ Unfall + - Menschliche Fehlhandlungen Menschliche Korrektur- handlungen Menschen sind nicht nur Schwachstellen... sondern oft auch Retter in der Not

76 Thank you very much! Norbert K. Semmer University of Bern Psychology of Work and Organizations SwissTransfusion September 6, 2013

77 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 77

78 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 78 Gründe für unsicheres Arbeiten Antwort-Beispiele aus kanadischer Interview-Studie Eine Person, die zu schwere Säcke trägt: Ich habe meine eigenen Interessen hinten angestellt. Es war mir wichtiger, dass die anderen zufrieden waren mit der Art, wie ich meine Arbeit machte. Er denkt, er wirkt wie ein Schwächling, wenn er die Sicherheitsausrüstung trägt. Jemand wollte eine Arbeit wegen Sicherheitsbedenken nicht ausführen: Wir haben ihn nachher zur Rede gestellt... Wir haben ihm klar gemacht, was Sache war, und wenn er das noch einmal machen sollte, dann würden wir dem Chef sagen, dass wir nicht mehr mit ihm arbeiten wollen. Er war einfach ein Feigling. Mullen, J. (2004). Investigating factors that influence individual saftey behavior at work. Journal of Safety Research 35,

79 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 79 Eine Handlung, die man zu zweit ausführen muss... Was passiert, wenn ich ihn frage? Er könnte glauben, ich kann das nicht alleine Er ärgert sich, weil er aus der Handlung gerissen wird Es kann dauern, bis er Zeit für mich hat Es passiert sicher nichts Ich halte die Vorschrift ein Was passiert, wenn ich nicht frage? Bei meiner Erfahrung kann doch gar nichts schief gehen Ich kann zeigen, dass ich das auch alleine kann Ich kann zeigen, dass ich nicht ängstlich bin Es geht alles schneller Ich verletze die Vorschrift Ein Kollege ist in der Nähe. Er hat gerade viel zu tun. Soll ich ihn fragen, mir zu helfen?

80 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 80 RISKOKOMPENSATION Unterschätzung von Risiken Steigerung riskanten Verhaltens Extreme technische Sicherheit Sorgloses Verhalten

81 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 81 RISKOKOMPENSATION: Beispiele Untersuchung von Taxifahrern mit und ohne ABS Aschenbrenner u.a., 1988 ABS: Verbesserte Bremswirkung Rein technisch: Gewinn bezüglich Unfallhäufigkeit zu erwarten Tatsächlich: Keine Unfallreduktion Kompensation durch Verhalten, z.B. schlechtere Spurhaltung mehr unangepasstes Einordnen Mehr Gefährdungen Höhere Geschwindigkeit Aschenbrenner, M, Biehl, B. & Wurm G. (1988). Einfluss der Risikokompensation auf die Wirkung von Verkehrssicherheitsmassnahmen am Beispiel ABS. In B. Ludborzs (Hrsg.), Psychologie der Arbeitssicherheit, 4. Workshop 1988 (S ), Heidelberg: Asanger. Musahl, H.P., Miller-Gethmann, H., Thomas, C., & Alsleben, K. (1992). Sind gute Wege gefahrlich? Zur Gefahrenkognition bei Fahrungsunfällen im Bergbau. In B. Zimolong u. R. Trimpop (Hrsg.), Psychologie der Arbeitssicherheit,6. Workshop 1991 (S ). Heidelberg: Asanger. Gefahrenwahrnehmung im Bergbau Musahl et al., 1992 Wahrnehmung des Risikos für Fahrungsunfälle am geringsten in Bergwerk mit guten Fahrwegen – tatsächliche Unfallzahlen höher als in Bergwerken, die gefährlicher wirkten.

82 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer M4M4 Versagen der Bremsen A3A3 P stösst gegen eine Mauer Verletzung U2U2 A2A2 M3M3 starkes Gefälle hat LKW überladen Bremsen in schlechtem Zustand U = Umwelt, A = Arbeiter, M = Maschine U1U1 A1A1 befährt eine andere Strecke gewöhnl. Weg nicht befahrbar M2M2 M1M1 Ersatz- LKW gewöhnl. benutzter LKW defekt A2A2 Ersatz-LKW nicht gewartet Diagramm eines LKW-Unfalls 82

83 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 83 P Plant Links- statt Rechtskurve PP Unterschreitet Mindestflughöhe Absturz CP Schülerrolle U = Umwelt, P = Pilot, CP = Copilot M = Material/Info U2U2 Landebahn hat kein minimum safe altitude warning U1U1 P Ungewohnter Anflug gewöhnl. Landebahn nicht verfügbar M1M1 M1M1 Info Wetter, Ort, Flughöhe Besetzung Flugsicherung P Müdigkeit Diagramm eines Flug-Unfalls

84 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Fehler Fehler sind Handlungen, die nicht so verlaufen wie geplant 84 Das impliziert: Fehler können nur auftreten, wo Ziele da sind (zumindest implizit) Daher können nur Menschen Fehler machen (Maschinen haben Defekte oder Störungen) Fehler können nur auftreten, wenn der ungeplante Verlauf im Prinzip vermeidbar ist Das fördert Schuldzuschreibungen (Attribution) Fehler führen selten zu gravierenden Konsequenzen Meist werden sie entdeckt und bereinigt, bevor etwas passiert (gestaffelte Barrieren) Damit gravierende Folgen eintreten (z.B. Unfall / fehlerhaftes Produkt wird ausgeliefert) muss meist sehr viel zusammenkommen Zapf, D., Frese, M., & Brodbeck, F. (1999). Fehler und Fehlermanagement. In D. Frey, C. G. Hoyos, & D. Stahlberg (Hrsg.), Arbeits- und Organisationspsychologie (s ). Weiheim: Beltz

85 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 85 Aber: Arbeitserfahrung (Tenure) erscheint bedeutsam… > Forscherteam um Paul Aylin vom Imperial College in London > Analyse von Daten von knapp Patienten … > Ergebnis: unter Kontrolle von Alter, Geschlecht, sozialer Status oder begleitende Krankheiten: > In der ersten Augustwoche starben durchschnittlich sechs Prozent mehr Notfallpatienten im Krankenhaus als in der letzten Juliwoche. > In Großbritannien treten die "junior doctors" normalerweise am 1. Mittwoch im August ihren Dienst an. Jen MH, Bottle A, Majeed A, Bell D, Aylin P (2009) Early In-Hospital Mortality following Trainee Doctors' First Day at Work. PLoS ONE 4(9): e7103. doi: /journal.pone Merkmale der Person können also durchaus eine Rolle spie- len; aber die Theorie, dass es – in einem ganz allgemeinen Sinne – Unfäller gibt, kann als widerlegt angesehen werden

86 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 86 Fehlertypen Beabsichtigte Handlungen Sicherheitsgefährdende Handlungen Sicherheits- gefährdende Handlungen Unbeabsichtigte Handlungen Patzer (slips) Schnitzer (lapses) Fehler (mistakes) Verstoss Aufmerksamkeitsfehler Störung Vertauschung Fehlanordnung Zeitliches Missmanagement Gedächtnisfehler Unterlassung geplanter Schritte Verlust des aktuellen Standes der Dinge Vergessen der ursprünglichen Absicht regelbasierte Fehler Falsche Anwendung einer guten Regel Anwendung einer schlechten Regel wissensbasierte Fehler viele verschiedene Formen Reason, J. (1994). Menschliches Versagen: Psychologische Risikofaktorenund moderne Technologien (p. 255). Heidelberg: Spektrum.

87 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 87 Skill-based Sensumotorische Regulation Schnitzer / Patzer Knowledge-based Intellektuelle Regulation Wissensbasierte Fehler (Irrtümer) Rule-based Flexible Handlungsmuster Regelbasierte Fehler Fehler und Regulationsebenen

88 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 88 Kontrollebene und dominierende Fehlerart Fehlerarten und fehlerbeeinflussende Faktoren auf verschiedenen Kontrollebenen I Zimolong (1990), erweitert nach Rasmussen, 1982; Reason, 1986 Fehlerauslösende Bedingungen Zeitliche Nähe und Häufigkeit in der vorherigen Nutzung (Gewohnheit, Stereotypisierung Unbeabsichtigte Auslösung durch gemeinsame Merkmale (Assoziationsfehler) Sensumotorische Regulation: Handlungsfehler Zimolong, B. (1990). Fehler und Zuverlässigkeit. In C. Graf Hoyos & B. Zimolong (Hrsg.), Ingenieurpsychologie. Enzyklopädie der Psychologie, Themenbereich D, Serie III, Bd. 2, (S ). Göttingen: Hogrefe. (Tab. 6, S. 326)

89 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 89 Regelebene: Verwechslungs- oder Beschreibungsfehler Fehlerarten und fehlerbeeinflussende Faktoren auf verschiedenen Kontrollebenen II Zimolong (1990), erweitert nach Rasmussen, 1982; Reason, 1986 Kontrollebene und dominierende Fehlerart Fehlerauslösende Bedingungen Regelebene: Verwechslungs- oder Beschreibungsfehler Einstellung: schematische Sichtweise (Das haben wir schon immer so gemacht) Repräsentativität von Sachverhalten und Lösungsmustern (Das hatten wir schon) Zimolong, B. (1990). Fehler und Zuverlässigkeit. In C. Graf Hoyos & B. Zimolong (Hrsg.), Ingenieurpsychologie. Enzyklopädie der Psychologie, Themenbereich D, Serie III, Bd. 2, (S ). Göttingen: Hogrefe. (Tab. 6, S. 326)

90 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Diagnostic performance of physicians > Main diagnosis incorrect in 25-45% of cases (Autopsy studies: Shojania et al., 2003; Cameron et al., 1980) > Causes of diagnostic failures Person factors – from overconfidence to lack of experience (Graber, 2005, Redelmeer, 2005, Croskerry, 2005, Kuhn, 2002) Context factors – fatigue, emergency etc. (Croskerry & Sinclair, 2001, Espinosa & Noaln, 2000; Guly, 2001; Hallas & Ellingsen, 2006) Cognitive biases – Tversky and Kahneman (Croskerry, 2002) Absence of reasoning (Denig, 2003, Kuhn, 2002)

91 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Procedure > High fidelity patient simulator, groups of three (two) MDs > Patient transferred from Emergency Room Oral information given by the ER-resident (confederate) – Pneumonia, treated with an IV antibiotic (penicillin) Hands over the patient file to one group member Correct diagnosis – Patient is allergic to penicillin and reacts with a severe anaphylactic shock, situation fatal within minutes > Ambiguous condition: – Confederate also reports failed attempt to put a subclavian IV access Plausible, but wrong diagnosis – Attempt of subclavian access caused left tension pneumothorax (collapsed lung on left side), dangerous

92 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Distinguishing analphylactic shock from tension pneumothorax Shared symptoms Shortness of breath, caughing, low oxygen saturation, low blood pressure, dizziness Distinguishing symptoms Tension pneumothorax: no breathing sound in affected lung Chest pains … Anaphylactic Shock Bronchospasm Ventricular tachycardia …

93 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Hypotheses 1. Task ambiguity influences error rate: – In a more ambiguous situation teams fail the correct diagnosis more often 2. Diagnostic reasoning influences quality of diagnosis Groups that find the correct diagnosis – have a more extensive data gathering phase (i.e. read the patient file; consider more aspects for diagnosis) – have a more explicit reasoning process – Communicate limits of knowledge – Meta-communication about diagnostic process – More causal reasoning (e.g. if- then; because, therefore) – Talking to the room (Artman & Waern, 1998) 3. Signs of confirmation bias?

94 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Situational Ambiguity (distracting information) and Diagnostic Performance Correct diagnosisCorrect diagnosis with helpMissed diagnosis N=39 groups; Chi 2 (2)=11.97, p=.002 High ambiguity (distractor): N = 20 groups Low ambiguity (no distractor: N = 19 groups Distractor No Distractor No Distractor No Distractor Serious diagnostic shortcomings: Low ambiguity: 3 / 19 = 16% High ambiguity: 14 / 20 = 70% all further analyses: high ambiguity situation only

95 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Hypotheses 1. Task ambiguity influences error rate: – In a more complex situation teams fail the correct diagnosis more often 2. Diagnostic reasoning influences quality of diagnosis Groups that find the correct diagnosis have a more extensive data gathering phase (i.e. read the patient file; consider more aspects for diagnosis) have a more explicit reasoning process Communicating limits of knowledge Meta-communication about diagnostic process More causal reasoning (e.g. if- then; because, therefore) Talking to the room (Artman & Waern, 1998) 3. Signs of comfirmation bias?

96 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Analysis of the ambiguous situation > Word-by word transcript of group communication > Transcript of selected actions (e.g. inspecting the patient file) > Coding according to research questions Handling of patient file Number of different information discussed before stating first diagnosis Reasoning re diagnostic information – number of if-then / because / therefore / so… etc. Communicating insecurities Meta-communication about the diagnostic process Talking to the room All kappas >.75

97 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Gathering information: Aspects considered before the first diagnosis is made (correct or not) Number of diagnostic aspects mentioned before first diagnosis n.s. Not significant; hypothesis not confirmed

98 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Reasoning: insecurity and meta- communication > Number of statements of insecurity made before the first diagnosis less than one per group no significant differences > Meta-communication (reflecting about the diagnostic process) less than one statement per group no significant differences

99 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Number of statements of insecurity (I dont know; not sure, is it really..) before the first diagnosis is made F(2)=.765, p=.483, ns, 2 groups that diagnosed based on the file are excluded from this analysis

100 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Reasoning before first diagnosis was made (if-then / because / therefore, etc. ) F(2)=5.75, p=.014, R 2 adj.=.35; Bonferroni: correct different from help, missed. 2 groups that diagnosed based on the file are excluded from this analysis

101 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Reasoning: Talking to the room F(2)=6.859, p=.008, R 2 adj.=.41; Bonferroni: correct different from help, missed. 2 groups that diagnosed based on the file are excluded from this analysis

102 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Hypotheses 1. Task complexity influences error rate: – In a more complex situation teams fail the correct diagnosis more often 2. Diagnostic reasoning influences quality of diagnosis Groups that find the correct diagnosis – have a more extensive data gathering phase (i.e. read the patient file; consider more aspects for diagnosis) – have a more explicit reasoning process – Communicate limits of knowledge – Meta-communication about diagnostic process – More causal reasoning (e.g. if- then; because, therefore) – Talking to the room (Artman & Waern, 1998) 3. Signs of confirmation bias?

103 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Signs of conformity > After pneumothorax diagnosis was suggested, some physicians auscultated several times before «hearing» differences: Contagious illusion or conformity? > Some physicians do not communicate but show behavioral signs of disagreement E.g., one physician – stops the penicillin – « murmurs » that it might be an anaphylactic shock S=refers to page Bizzari

104 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Spezielle Probleme 104

105 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 105 Der Multitasking-Mythos: Autofahren und Telephonieren > Echtes Multitasking allenfalls möglich, wenn eine Komponente hoch automatisiert ist > Ansonsten: Multitasking = Schneller Aufmerksamkeitswechsel (Loukopoulos & Dismukes, 2009) Loukopoulos, L. D., R. D. Dismukes, et al. (2009). The multitasking myth. Handling complexity in real-world operations. Burlington, VT:, Ashgate. Redelmeier, D. A., & Tibshirani, R. J. (19979). Association between celluar-telephone calls and motor vehicle collisions. New England Journal of Medicine, 336, Strayer, D. L., Drews, F. A., & Crouch, D. J. (2006): a comparison of the cell phone driver and the drunk driver. Human Factors, 48, > Telephonieren während des Autofahrens erhöht das Unfallrisiko > Gilt auch bei freihändigem Telephonieren! > Problem der Aufmerksamkeit, nicht des Handling Risiko vergleichbar 0.8 Alkohol (Redelmeier & Tibshirani, 1997; epidemiologische Studie) Experimentelle Studie: (Strayer et al., 2006) > Handy: mehr Auffahrunfälle, längere Reaktionszeit > Unfallrisiko ca. 5 x höher. > Kein Unterschied freihändig / manuell > Vergleichbarkeit des Risikos mit Alkohol (0.8) bestätigt

106 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 106 Zohar et al.: Feedback etablieren Zohar, D. (2002). Modifying supervisory practices to Improve Subunit Safety: A leadership-based intervention model. Journal of Applied Psychology, 87, > Problem: Feedback über sicherheitsgerechtes Verhalten nützt. > Aber: Muss ständig gegeben werden (s. Komaki et al., 1987). Zohar: Zum Bestandteil alltäglicher Interaktion mit Vorgesetzten machen > Messungen: > Beobachtung sicheren Verhaltens (Gehörschutz tragen) > Mikro-Unfälle (Verletzungen) auf Grund von Verstössen > Regelmässige Kurzinterviews mit Arbeitern: Thema: Interaktionen mit Vorgesetzten zum Thema sicheres Verhalten > Intervention: > Vorgesetzte: Feedback zur Anzahl ihrer sicherheitsbezogener Interaktionen > Deren Vorgesetzte > Feedback über die sicherheitsbezogenen Interaktionen der unmittelbaren Vorgesetzten > geben diesen Feedback (mit Bewertung) über ihre sicherheits- bezogenen Interaktionen im Vergleich mit ihren Kollegen

107 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Ergebnisse Zohar I Sicherheitsgespräche und Gehörschutz 107 Figure 1. Interrupted time-series data of supervisory safety practices and earplug use. exp. experimental group; cont. control group. Gehörschutz Interaktionen Gehörschutz Interaktionen Zohar, D. (2002). Modifying supervisory practices to improve subunit safety: A leadership-based intervention model. Journal of Applied Psychology, 87, NachmessungenInterventionBaseline Kontrollgruppe Experimentalgruppe

108 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Ergebnisse Zohar I Sicherheitsgespräche und Gehörschutz 108 Figure 1. Interrupted time-series data of supervisory safety practices and earplug use. exp. experimental group; cont. control group. Gehörschutz exp. Interaktionen exp. Gehörschutz KG Interaktionen KG Zohar, D. (2002). Modifying supervisory practices to improve subunit safety: A leadership-based intervention model. Journal of Applied Psychology, 87,

109 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Interaction between Exp. condition and treatment phase (microaccident rate) AFTERBEFORE Exp. Group Control Group Zohar, D. (2002). Modifying supervisory practices to improve subunit safety: A leadership-based intervention model. Journal of applied psychology, 87, INJURY RATE

110 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Ergebnisse Zohar II Verletzungen 110 Figure 2. Interaction between experimental (EXP.) condition and treatment phase (microaccident rate). KONTROLLGRUPPE EXPERIMENTALGRUPPE Zohar, D. (2002). Modifying supervisory practices to improve subunit safety: A leadership-based intervention model. Journal of Applied Psychology, 87,

111 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer 111 EreignisSubjektive Repräsentation des Ereignisses Operator Unfall Objektive Regelwidrigkeit, die zumindest post-hoc erkannt wird Abschwächung Beinahe - Unfall Regelwidrigkeit ist subjektiv bekannt Beinahe- Unfall wird erkannt Abschwächung Beinahe- Unfall wird nicht erkannt Negative Verstärkung* Regelwidrigkeit ist subjektiv nicht bekannt Beinahe- Unfall wird erkannt Abschwächung Beinahe- Unfall wird nicht erkannt Positive Verstärkung Verstärkung und Abschwächung regelwidrigen Verhaltens: Unfall & Beinahe-Unfall, deren subjektive Repräsentation und der resultierende lerntheoretische Operator Nach: Musahl, H.-P. (1997). Gefahrenkognition: Theoretische Annäherungen, empirische Befunde und Anwendungsbezüge zur subjektiven Gefahrenkenntnis. Heidelberg: Asanger. [Tab. 29; S. 381] *Negative Verstärkung sensu Skinner: Verhalten wird verstärkt durch das Ausbleiben (oder Beendigung) einer Bestrafung

112 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Safety Climate: Organization Level (1 = completely disagree – 5 = completely agree) Top management in this plant – company 1. Reacts quickly to solve the problem when told about safety hazards. 2. Insists on thorough and regular safety audits and inspections. 3. Tries to continually improve safety levels in each deparment. 4. Provides all the equipment needed to do the job safely. 5. Is strict about working safely when work falls behind schedule. 6. Quickly corrects any safety hazard (even if its costly). 7. Provides detailed safety reports to workers (e.g., injuries, near accidents). 8. Considers a persons safety behavior when moving-promoting people. 9. Requires each manager to help improve safety in his-her department. 10. Invests a lot of time and money in safety training for workers 11. Uses any available information to improve existing safety rules. 12. Listens carefully to workers ideas about improving safety. 13. Considers safety when setting production speed and schedules. 14. Provides workers with a lot of information on safety issues. 15. Regularly holds safety-awareness events (e.g., presentations, ceremonies). 16. Gives safety personnel the power they need to do their job. Note. Items cover three content themes: Active Practices (Monitoring, Enforcing), Proactive Practices (Promoting Learning, Development), and Declarative Practices (Declaring, Informing). Zohar, D., & Luria, G. (2005). A multilevel model of safety climate: Cross-level relationships between organization and group-level climates. Journal of Applied Psychology, 90,

113 Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer My direct supervisor 1. Makes sure we receive all the equipment needed to do the job safely. 2. Frequently checks to see if we are all obeying the safety rules. 3. Discusses how to improve safety with us. 4. Uses explanations (not just compliance) to get us to act safely. 5. Emphasizes safety procedures when we are working under pressure. 6. Frequently tells us about the hazards in our work. 7. Refuses to ignore safety rules when work falls behind schedule. 8. Is strict about working safely when we are tired or stressed. 9. Reminds workes who need reminders to work safely. 10. Makes sure we follow all the safety rules (not just the most imortant ones). 11. Insists that we obey safety rules when fixing equipment or machines. 12. Says a good word to workers who pay special attention to safety. 13. Is strict about safety at the end of the shift, when we want to go home. 14. Spends time helping us learn to see problems before they arise. 15. Frequently talks about safety issues throughout the work week. 16. Insists we wear our protective equipment even if it is uncomfortable. Note. Items cover three content themes: Active Practices (Monitoring, Controlling), Proactive Practices (Instructing, Guiding), and Declarative Practices (Declaring, Informing). Zohar, D., & Luria, G. (2005). A multilevel model of safety climate: Cross-level relationships between organization and group-level climates. Journal of Applied Psychology, 90, Safety Climate: Group Level (1 = completely disagree – 5 = completely agree)

114 Vielen Dank!


Herunterladen ppt "Psychology of Work and Organizations, N. K. Semmer Norbert K. Semmer University of Bern Psychology of Work and Organizations 1 Geneva September 6, 2013."

Ähnliche Präsentationen


Google-Anzeigen