Die Präsentation wird geladen. Bitte warten

Die Präsentation wird geladen. Bitte warten

l Bildbenennung l Wortgenerierung(z.B. Nennen Sie möglichst viele Tiere!) l Wortlesen (HUND) l Pseudowortlesen(HUNG) Analyse von 82 Hirnaktivierungsxperimenten.

Ähnliche Präsentationen


Präsentation zum Thema: "l Bildbenennung l Wortgenerierung(z.B. Nennen Sie möglichst viele Tiere!) l Wortlesen (HUND) l Pseudowortlesen(HUNG) Analyse von 82 Hirnaktivierungsxperimenten."—  Präsentation transkript:

1

2 l Bildbenennung l Wortgenerierung(z.B. Nennen Sie möglichst viele Tiere!) l Wortlesen (HUND) l Pseudowortlesen(HUNG) Analyse von 82 Hirnaktivierungsxperimenten mit vier verschiedenen Wortproduktionsaufgaben:

3 Talairach & Tournoux (1988) Lateral and medial view of reference brain

4 Reported at least once

5 Estimate of probability of overlap under the assumption of a random distribution of activated regions number of regions: 110 mean number of activated regions:r chance probability for a region to be reported as activated in a single experiment (p 1 ):r/110 chance probability for a region to be reported as activated in n 1 out of n experiments: ( with n 1 + n 2 = n )

6 Reliability criterion: p < 0.1 cut-off point in binomial distribution Example region 1 Number of experiments:82 Mean number of reported regions:12.4 Reliably activated:12 or more experiments Reliably not activated:4 or less experiments Example region 2 Number of experiments:23 Mean number of reported regions:10.4 Reliably activated:5 or more experiments Reliably not activated: -

7 Zuverlässig aktivierte (rot) und nicht aktivierte (blau) Hirngebiete (basierend auf allen 82 Studien)

8 TASK ANALYSIS Many tasks were not just word production tasks; they involved other operations as well. For instance, when you name the picture of a horse, you not only produce the word 'horse', but you also look at the picture and recognize it. Such additional 'lead-in' operations involve the activation of additional brain regions. These should be filtered out. That requires a systematic task analysis, a distinction between 'lead-in' and 'core' operations of word production.

9 Responses during Verb Generation Task BANANA TROUSERS CHAIR GLASSES TRUMPET PENCIL BUTTON BIRD EAR DOOR peel, slip on, eat up, plant put on, wash, mend, buy, warm sit, build, nail, sell, work, learn clean, put on, step on, buy, see blow, make music, put away, hear, play sharpen, break, put away, draw tear off, close, open fly, eat up, sing hear, pinch open, close, kick against

10 Konzeptuelle Vorbereitung lexikalische Selektion lexikalisches Konzept Lemma Wortformzugriff Wortform Syllabifizierung phonologisches Wort phonetische Enkodierung abstraktes Motorprogramm Artikulation gesprochenes Wort visuelle Objekt- erkennung Einleitungsprozesse KernprozesseAufgabe Worterkennung Objektvorstellung Gedächtnis etc. visuelle Worterkennung Graphem/Phonem Konversion Bildbenennung Wortgenerierung Wortlesen Pseudowortlesen Selbstmonitoring aussprechen vs. Wort “denken”

11 Bildbenennung

12 Wortgenerierung

13 Bildbenennung (grün), Wortgenerierung (blau), gemeinsame Gebiete (rot)

14 Gemeinsame Aktivierungsgebiete von Bildbenennung und Wortgenerierung

15 Konzeptuelle Vorbereitung lexikalische Selektion lexikalisches Konzept Lemma Wortformzugriff Wortform Syllabifizierung phonologisches Wort phonetische Enkodierung abstraktes Motorprogramm Artikulation gesprochenes Wort visuelle Objekt- erkennung Einleitungsprozesse KernprozesseAufgabe Worterkennung Objektvorstellung Gedächtnis etc. visuelle Worterkennung Graphem/Phonem Konversion Bildbenennung Wortgenerierung Wortlesen Pseudowortlesen Selbstmonitoring aussprechen vs. Wort “denken”

16 Konzeptuelle Vorbereitung lexikalische Selektion lexikalisches Konzept Lemma Wortformzugriff Wortform Syllabifizierung phonologisches Wort phonetische Enkodierung abstraktes Motorprogramm Artikulation gesprochenes Wort visuelle Objekt- erkennung Einleitungsprozesse KernprozesseAufgabe Worterkennung Objektvorstellung Gedächtnis etc. visuelle Worterkennung Graphem/Phonem Konversion Bildbenennung Wortgenerierung Wortlesen Pseudowortlesen Selbstmonitoring aussprechen vs. Wort “denken”

17 Wortlesen

18 Gemeinsame Aktivierungsgebiete von Bildbenennung, Wortgenerierung und Wortlesen

19 Konzeptuelle Vorbereitung lexikalische Selektion lexikalisches Konzept Lemma Wortformzugriff Wortform Syllabifizierung phonologisches Wort phonetische Enkodierung abstraktes Motorprogramm Artikulation gesprochenes Wort visuelle Objekt- erkennung Einleitungsprozesse KernprozesseAufgabe Worterkennung Objektvorstellung Gedächtnis etc. visuelle Worterkennung Graphem/Phonem Konversion Bildbenennung Wortgenerierung Wortlesen Pseudowortlesen Selbstmonitoring aussprechen vs. Wort “denken”

20 Gemeinsame Aktivierungsgebiete aller Aufgaben

21 Aussprechen im Vergleich zu Wort “denken”

22 Schematische Darstellung des Ergebnisses der Meta-Analyse von 82 Hirnaktivierungsstudien Indefrey, P. and Levelt, W.J.M. (2004) Cognition

23 The cognitive architecture of listening to language speech signal interpretation decoding segmenting speech code phonemes, syllables phonological processing word recognition syntactic analysis thematic analysis integration with other knowledge sources

24 Tekst Sereno Speech signal Then once you have examined the city you can get a uh nice contrast to the surrounding country side - uh a very unique country side which contrasts the distinction between the the mountains to the uh low land of the coastal regions where there is a lot more uh fishing.

25 snelheid proposities (rate of propositions) secon ds snelheid lexical access (rate of words) snelheid klanken (rate of phonemes)

26 mixing van alle vier speech signal rate of propositions rate of words rate of phonemes

27 Reversed speech versus silence

28 Word lists versus silence

29 StudyStimulus# Belin ms frequency transition, 60/min1 Belin ms frequency transition, 60/min2 Belin 1999synthetic diphthong, 6/min3 Binder 2000tones, different frequencies, 90/min4 Bookheimer 1998pseudowords, 9/min5 Celsis 1999syllables, 180/min6 Celsis 1999tones, Hz, 180/min7 di Salle 2001tones, 1000Hz, 6/min8 Engelien 1995environmental sounds, 10/min9 Fiez 1996pseudowords, 60/min10 Fiez 1996words, 60/min11 Giraud 2000vowels vs. expecting vowels, 120/min12 Holcomb 1998tones, 1500Hz + lower tones, 30/min13 Jäncke 1999tones, 1000Hz, 60/min14 Lockwood 1999tones, Hz, 60/min15 Mellet 1996words, 30/min16 Mirz 1999music17 Mirz 1999sentences18 StudyStimulus# Mirz 1999tones, 1000Hz19 Mirz 1999tones, Hz20 Mirz 1999words21 Müller 1997sentences, 12/min22 Petersen 1988words, 60/min23 Price 1996words, 40/min24 Price 1996words, different rates25 Suzuki 2002awords, 60/min26 Suzuki 2002btones, 1000Hz, 60/min27 Thivard 2000tones with spectral maxima, 60/min28 Warburton 1996words, 4/min29 Wise 1991pseudowords, 40 or 60/min30 Wong 1999reversed sentences, 30/min31 Wong 1999sentences, 30/min32 Wong 1999words, 30/min33 Wong 2002reversed words, 15/min34 Wong 2002sentences, 12/min35 Wong 2002words, 15/min36 Indefrey & Cutler, 2004 Studies comparing auditory stimuli to silent baseline conditions

30 StudyStimulus vs. control stimulus# Benson 2001CVC > CV > V1 Binder 1996words vs. tones2 Binder 2000pseudo vs. tones3 Binder 2000reversed words vs. tones4 Binder 2000words vs. tones5 Giraud 2000amplitude modulated noise vs. noise6 Giraud 2000sentences vs. vowels7 Giraud 2000words vs. vowels8 Hall 2002frequency modulated vs. static tone9 Hall 2002harmonic vs. single tone10 Jäncke 2002syllables vs. 350 ms white noise bursts11 Jäncke 2002syllables vs. steady state portion of vowel12 Jäncke 2002syllables vs. tones13 Müller % 1000Hz + 10% 500Hz vs. 1000Hz14 Mummery 1999words vs. signal correlated noise15 Price 1996words vs. reversed words16 Schlosser 1998sentences vs. unknown language17 Scott 2000sentences vs. rotated sentences18 Thivard 2000frequency transition vs. stationary tone19 Indefrey & Cutler, 2004 Studies comparing auditory stimuli to simpler auditory stimuli

31 Talairach & Tournoux (1988) Lateral and medial view of reference brain

32

33 Silent control

34

35 When do activation maxima agree reliably between studies?

36 Silent control

37

38

39 Narain et al. 2003, Fig. 2

40 Silent control

41

42

43

44

45 What about the functional roles of these areas?

46 Silent control

47 Auditory control

48

49 Silent control

50

51 Listening to speech without an additional task induces extensive bilateral temporal activation but no reliable activation of Broca’s area. Summary

52 With increasing linguistic complexity of stimuli, the distance of activation maxima from the primary auditory cortex increases; particularly in the left hemisphere. It seems to be the highest linguistic processing level that leads to the most significant activation difference compared to a silent control. Summary

53 The left hemisphere shows a clearer stimulus-specific differentiation of activation maxima. Areas that seem to be especially related to (post-) lexical and sentence level processing can be identified. Summary

54 bilateral posterior STG: phonology left posterior STS: lexical phonology left anterior STS: possibly lexical and sentential prosody, possibly lexical and sentential meaning Summary

55 Hagoort & Indefrey, in press

56 Neuroimaging studies on sentence processing Hagoort & Indefrey, in press

57

58

59

60

61

62

63 Haller, Klarhöfer, Radue, Schwarzbach, & Indefrey (2007) Eur. J. Neuroscience

64 Stimuli

65 Haller, Klarhöfer, Radue, Schwarzbach, & Indefrey (2007) Eur. J. Neuroscience

66 Bookheimer (2002), Fig. 2

67 Haller, Klarhöfer, Radue, Schwarzbach, & Indefrey (2007) Eur. J. Neuroscience

68 wegstossen-Animation(1)

69 wegstossen-Animation(2)

70 Condition1: Sentences Der rote Kreis stößt die grüne Ellipse weg. (The red circle pushes the green ellipse away.) Condition 2: Noun phrases roter Kreis, grüne Ellipse, wegstoßen (red circle, green ellipse, push away) Condition 3: Single words Kreis, rot, Ellipse, grün, wegstoßen (circle, red, ellipse, green, push away) All conditions at slow (6/min) and fast (8/min) rate.

71 Sentences vs. Single Words Activation maximum at -60,14,12 Indefrey et al. (2004) Brain & Language Activation maximum at -54,6,10 Indefrey et al. (2001) PNAS

72 S and NP production vs. control (W) Indefrey, Hellwig, Herzog, Seitz & Hagoort (2004) Brain & Language

73 Conclusions (1) l The left posterior IFG and the left posterior temporal lobe subserve syntactic comprehension. l Neural activation in syntactic comprehension depends on the need for syntactic analysis. l The two areas do not subserve the same function, because the temporal area does not seem to respond to syntactic errors and is not found in syntactic production.

74 Aufgabe vom l Finden Sie eine neue Studie (ab 2006) in der mit FMRI, PET, oder NIRS entweder Wortproduktion oder Wortverstehen oder Satzverstehen untersucht wurde. l Vergleichen Sie die Ergebnisse mit der entsprechenden Meta-analyse. l Wodurch könnten Unterschiede zustande gekommen sein? 73


Herunterladen ppt "l Bildbenennung l Wortgenerierung(z.B. Nennen Sie möglichst viele Tiere!) l Wortlesen (HUND) l Pseudowortlesen(HUNG) Analyse von 82 Hirnaktivierungsxperimenten."

Ähnliche Präsentationen


Google-Anzeigen