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TALENT-FRIENDLY ENVIRONMENT Austrian Research and Support Centre for the Gifted and Talented (özbf) Claudia E. Resch 25. September 2009.

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Präsentation zum Thema: "TALENT-FRIENDLY ENVIRONMENT Austrian Research and Support Centre for the Gifted and Talented (özbf) Claudia E. Resch 25. September 2009."—  Präsentation transkript:

1 TALENT-FRIENDLY ENVIRONMENT Austrian Research and Support Centre for the Gifted and Talented (özbf) Claudia E. Resch 25. September 2009

2 What a child needs loving and holistic education that offers them the opportunity to explore their environment independently holistic development: promoting cognitive development BUT also social, emotional and motoric competences Offer various impressions and stimuli Free space for undisturbed play and exploration promotes concentration and self-initiative

3 What a child needs Develop the childs personality parents exert considerable influence and act as role models Develop a positive self-concept, self-confidence, persistence, joy with ones achievements and the acquisition of appropriate problem-solving strategies Parents should ask themselves: –What interests does my child have? –How much stimulation does it need? –How much time does it need for itself? –Where does it need support? Where does it need its parents trust in its abilities?

4 How can I provide support for my gifted child at home? Support should be geared to childs interests and needs child decides form, length and intensity of the support Parents: encourage child to try out new areas Primary experiences are very important Children learn best when they are exposed to direct experiences However, the childrens interests and needs should always be the focus.

5 How can I provide support for my gifted child at home? Provide them with a variety of offers in order to find out what their interests really are. reading and being read to are important activities Show your child how to use libraries Support your child in finding answers to questions independently: through direct experiences, books, newspapers, CDs, documentaries, computer programmes, the internet or by visiting a museum promotes acquisition of research methods and the childs joy with the intellectual challenge

6 How can I provide support for my gifted child at home? –If you want to support your child with finding a solution to a problem, do not give him direct suggestions instead point to a connection between problem and solution –Speak with your child about its experiences Talk about books and stories which you have read together offer explanations for your decisions explain your reasons behind a decision

7 How can I provide support for my gifted child at home? Learning an instrument can be a great stimulus for the cognitive development. Learning a foreign language can, like musical education, also boost cognitive development. Main principle: –Support your child, but dont overstrain it. –A tree doesnt grow faster if you keep pulling it.

8 In a nutshell Create stimuli and incentives. Be interested and share your childs interests. Speak with your child as much as you can. Try to avoid overemphasising your childs intellectual abilities. Talent development is personality development Keep a balance between freedom and achievement If necessary, set clear boundaries to your child. However, always explain your reasons for your decisions. Dont compare your child with other children, only with itself. But in the end: Dont make yourself the slave of your childs talent development.

9 Howard Gardners Theory of Multiple Intelligences (1983) It is not a single potential (g-factor or general intelligence factor) that makes up for high intelligence Intelligence comprises of a number of relatively independent abilities analogy: The mind is not like one comprehensive computer but rather consists of several independently working computers Gardners theory questions the usefulness of traditional IQ tests which usually only focus on verbal and logical abilities.

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11 References Altenmüller, E., Gruhn, W., Parlitz, D. & Liebert, G. (2000). The Impact of Music Education on Brain Networks: Evidence from EEG-studies. International Journal of Music Education, 35, 1, Hany, E. (2000). Zitate aus dem unveröffentlichten Skript. In: H. Ulbricht (2002), Lern- und Verhaltensprobleme hochbegabter Kinder als Stolpersteine für die Schullaufbahn. München: Staatliche Schulberatung. Rost, D. (2007). Der liebe Herrgott ist gerecht. Auch Hochbegabte sind nur Menschen. Ein Gespräch mit Detlef H. Rost, der mit vielen Mythen aufräumt. In: DIE ZEIT, , Nr. 23. Perleth, C. & Schatz, T. (2004). Aus der Forschung: Zur Begabungsentwicklung und - förderung im Vorschulalter. In: H. Wagner (Hrsg.), Frühzeitig fördern: Hochbegabte im Kindergarten und in der Grundschule. Tagungsbericht (S ). Bad Honnef: K. H. Bock. Peterson, J. S. (2003). An Argument for Proactive Attention to Affective Concerns of Gifted Adolescents. Journal of Secondary Gifted Education, 14, 2, Stadelmann, W. (2003). Frühe Förderung und lebensbegleitendes Lernen im Lichte neuropsychologischer Erkenntnisse. Vortrag am OECD-Regionalseminar für deutschsprachige Länder vom 29. September bis 2. Oktober 2003 in Wien. Zugriff am unter Velay, J. & Longcamp, M. (2007). Besser von Hand. Gehirn & Geist 3/2007,

12 Thank you very much for your attention!


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