Die Präsentation wird geladen. Bitte warten

Die Präsentation wird geladen. Bitte warten

Does Theory Matter ?? What is and why do we study international theory ?

Ähnliche Präsentationen


Präsentation zum Thema: "Does Theory Matter ?? What is and why do we study international theory ?"—  Präsentation transkript:

1 Does Theory Matter ?? What is and why do we study international theory ?

2 This file can be downloaded from our Website Doppeldiplom/aktuelles.html There you can also find further material to accompany the International Theory Seminar

3 Recommended Literature Classical Authors of International Relations 1.Adda B.Bozeman : Politics and Culture in International History. From the Ancient Near East to the Opening of the Modern Age. 2.Aufl. New Brunswick: Transaction Publishers Hedley Bull: The Anarchical Society. A Study of Order in World Politics. 3. Aufl.Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan Edward Hallett Carr: The Twenty Years Crisis 1919 – An Introduction to the Study of International Relations. 2.Aufl. London: Macmillan Barry Buzan/Richard Little: International Systems in World History. Remaking the Study of International Relations. Oxford: Oxford University Press Ernst-Otto Czempiel : Kluge Macht. Außenpolitik für das 21. Jahrhundert. München: C.H.Beck F.H.Hinsley: Power and the Pursuit of Peace. Theory and Practice in the History of Relations between States. Cambridge: Cambridge U.P Karl Kaiser/Hans-Peter Schwarz (Hrsg.): Weltpolitik im neuen Jahrhundert. Baden-Baden: Nomos Werner Link: Die Neuordnung der Weltpolitik. Grundprobleme globaler Politik an der Schwelle zum 21. Jahrhundert. München: C.H.Beck Hans J. Morgenthau: Politics Among Nations. New York:Alfred A.Knopf Edward L.Morse: Modernization and the Transformation of International Relations. New York: Free Press Kenneth N. Waltz: Man, the state and war. A theoretical analysis. New York: Columbia UP Adam Watson: The Evolution of International Society. A comparative historical analysis. London: Routledge Martin Wight: International Theory. The three traditions, ed. Gabriele Wight & Brian Porter. Leicester: Leicester U.P. 1991

4 Recommended Literature Biographical Extras: Kenneth W. Thompson (ed.): Masters of International Thought. Major Twentieth-Century Theorists and the World Crisis. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State UP 1980 Iver B.Neumann/Ole Waever (eds.): The Future of International Relations. Masters in the Making ? London: Routledge 1997

5 Recommended Literature Introductions, Overviews and Critiques of IR Theory Dario Battistella: Théories des Relations Internationales. Paris : Presses de Sciences Po 2003 Scott Burchill/Andrew Linklater (eds.): Theories of International Relations. Basingstoke: 3rd ed. Basingstoke: Palgrave/Macmillan 2005 James E.Dougherty/Robert L.Pfaltzgraff, Jr.: Contending Theories of International Relations. A comprehensive survey. 5th ed. New York: Longman 2001 Jim George: Discourses of Global Politics: A critical (re)introduction to International Relations. Boulder, Colorado: Lynne Rienner Publ Martin Hollis/Steve Smith: Explaining and Understanding International Relations. Oxford: Clarendon Press 1990 Charles W.Kegley, Jr. (ed.): Controversies in International Relations Theory. Realism and the Neoliberal Challenge. New York: St. Martins Press 1996 Gert Krell: Weltbilder und Weltordnung. Einführung in die Theorie der internationalen Beziehungen. 2.Aufl. Baden-Baden: Nomos 2003 Siegfried Schieder/Manuela Spindler (eds.): Theorien der Internationalen Beziehungen. Opladen: Leske & Budrich 2003 Steve Smith/Ken Booth/Marysia Zalewski (eds.): International theory: Positivism and beyond. Cambridge: Cambridge U.P Cynthia Weber: International Relations Theory. A critical Introduction. London: Routledge 2001 Ngaire Woods (ed.): Explaining International Relations Since Oxford: Oxford U.P. 1996

6 A system of general statements about reality, which are systematically ordered and subject to intersubjective corroboration Science the prediction of future phenomena and processes the choice of concrete options for action from a larger set of possible options the legitimation of the actions necessary to put the chosen option into practice On the basis of these statements, science aims at

7 Basic Concepts I Hypothesis and Explanation Hypothesis: conjectural statement about the relationship between two or more variables acting as starting point in an investigation; ideally a tight predictive statement derived deductively from models or other abstract statements and tested empirically against data to see if the event or state predicted actually occurs; of only provisional validity; must be testable by observation or experiment Explanation: subsumption of an individual case or phenomenon under a general law or a hypothesis; also explanation of a particular event by reference to preceding events

8 Basic Concepts II structurally identical with hypotheses. As a general rule, empirically tested hypotheses – or a set of empirically tested hypotheses – are called laws. Example: In his famous dog experiment, Pawlow formulated the hypothesis that under certain experimental conditions one impulse (provision of dog food) can be exchanged for another one (bell tone). After this hypothesis has been positively tested time and again over the years, it has gained the status of a law. In the social sciences, however, there exists not a single genuine law, because all law-like social scientific statements are limited by boundary conditions; they only formulate statements of varying degrees of probability Laws

9 Basic Concepts III Theories are systems of relative general scientific statements (or statements of laws connected to each other), which aim at the objection-free explanation of reality. In view of the requirement of generality it is at least doubtful, whether genuine theories exist in social science at all, due to the lack of genuine laws (cf. II above). At present, social research is dominated by middle-range theories, which only refer to particular social phenomena in particular societies at particular points in time. Theories are systems of relative general scientific statements (or statements of laws connected to each other), which aim at the objection-free explanation of reality. In view of the requirement of generality it is at least doubtful, whether genuine theories exist in social science at all, due to the lack of genuine laws (cf. II above). At present, social research is dominated by middle-range theories, which only refer to particular social phenomena in particular societies at particular points in time.

10 Basic Concepts IV Axioms are constitutive elements of each and every theory: basic assumptions, which, as it were, form the foundations of a theory, are regarded as "evident" (directly accessible to the human mind) and are no longer questioned by scientists. Axioms are hardly ever made explicit in social science theories. An axiom would e.g. be the assumption of decision- making approaches that human beings behave rationally or that they all have certain interests, which they follow openly or subcutaneously in their political behaviour.

11 Elements and functions of theory 1. Concept=> Construct => Ideal Type => Typology 2. Conceptual framework => pre-theory=> approach 2. Conceptual framework => pre-theory=> approach 3. Assumption=> Hypothesis =>Law 4. Axiom => Proposition/Theorem/Doctrine 5. Model => Scientific World View => Paradigm or Grand Theory 1.Descriptive Function (ontological theory) Statement of what really is 1.Descriptive Function (ontological theory) Statement of what really is 2. Explanatory Function (explanative theory) Formulation of reasons: Why has a particular phenomenon, which we can observe, happened ? 2. Explanatory Function (explanative theory) Formulation of reasons: Why has a particular phenomenon, which we can observe, happened ? 3. Justificatory or Corroborative Function (validating theory) Statement of the adequacy of the explanation: Why is there a valid explanation of the phenomenon we can observe presently? 3. Justificatory or Corroborative Function (validating theory) Statement of the adequacy of the explanation: Why is there a valid explanation of the phenomenon we can observe presently? THEORY

12 Functions of Theory 1.Descriptive Function (ontological theory) Statement of what really is 1.Descriptive Function (ontological theory) Statement of what really is 2. Explanatory Function (explanative theory) Formulation of reasons: Why has a particular phenomenon, which we can observe, happened ? 2. Explanatory Function (explanative theory) Formulation of reasons: Why has a particular phenomenon, which we can observe, happened ? 3. Justificatory or Corroborative Function (validating theory) Statement of the adequacy of the explanation: Why is there a valid explanation of the phenomenon we can observe presently? 3. Justificatory or Corroborative Function (validating theory) Statement of the adequacy of the explanation: Why is there a valid explanation of the phenomenon we can observe presently?

13 Prämisse gesellschaftliches, politisches und auch wissenschaftliches Handeln ist nicht unmittelbar als Reflex auf die reale Situation zu verstehen, auf die sich dieses Handeln bezieht. Vielmehr wird es gesteuert durch die Perzeption einer realen Situation und durch die Interpretation, d.h. durch das Bild, das wir uns von der Handlungssituation machen - unabhängig davon, ob die Handlungs- situation tatsächlich so beschaffen ist, wie wir sie sehen und interpretieren (Thomas- Theorem).

14 Kognitive Schemata Das Bild der politischen Realität wird nicht durch Informationen und Erfahrungen geprägt, die unmittelbar aus politischen Ereignissen, Krisen und Konflikten stammen. Sie werden vielmehr vermittelt - gleichsam gefiltert - durch politische und gesellschaftliche Interessen, Erfahrungen und Traditionen, denen das realitätswahrnehmende Subjekt im Prozeß seiner politischen Sozialisation ausgesetzt ist. In diesem Prozeß bilden sich Schablonen, Muster, Glaubenssätze, Verhaltensmaßstäbe, Urteile und Vor-Urteile - kognitive Schemata - die die Auswahl aktueller Informationen steuern und ihre Deutung und Bewertung bestimmen. Die Bedeutung dieser Schemata erhellt nicht zuletzt aus dem Umstand, daß der Mensch tagtäglich einer derart großen Menge an Informationen aus und über seine Umwelt ausgesetzt ist, daß sein Wahrnehmungs- und Informations- verarbeitungsvermögen binnen kurzem durch "information overload" blockiert würde, besäße er nicht die Möglichkeit, unter Rekurs auf kognitive Schemata die potentiell unendliche Informationsmenge zu begrenzen, aus ihr auszuwählen und das Ausgewählte nach bestimmten Bezugsmustern zu ordnen.

15 Verschiedenheit der Weltsichten Ganz besondere Bedeutung haben solche Muster und Schemata in Lebensbereichen, die wie die internationalen Beziehungen der unmittelbaren, alltäglichen Erfahrung des Individuums entzogen sind. Die Vorstellungen des Menschen über die politischen Ziele und Verhaltensweisen anderer Staaten bilden sich nach den in seinem Kopf vorhandenen, im Umgang mit gesellschaftlicher und politischer Realität erworbenen Wahrnehmungs- und Interpretationsmustern. Diese sind nicht für alle Menschen gleich, sondern je nach Qualität, Inhalt und Intensität der politischen Sozialisation des Individuums verschieden. Die Verschiedenheit der kognitiven Schemata und der von ihnen gesteuerten Wahrnehmungs- und Informationsverarbeitungsprozesse bedingt auch eine Verschiedenheit der individuellen Weltsichten. Allerdings läßt sich diese durch Konsensbildung - durch die Verabredung mehrerer Individuen dazu, Phänomene einheitlich zu bewerten und zu interpretieren - teilweise überbrücken und in einer verabredeten gemeinsamen Weltsicht aufheben. In stärker abstrahierend-kategorisierender, logisch-formalisierter und insbesondere an das Kriterium der Nachprüfbarkeit von Aussagen gebundener Form liegt dieser Prozeß auch der wissenschaftlichen Erkenntnis, vor allem aber auch dem Prozeß wissenschaftlicher Theoriebildung zugrunde.

16 Großtheorien internationaler Beziehungen Unsere Eingangsfrage nach den Gründen für die Disparatheit der inhaltlichen Füllungen der Grundbegriffe der Lehre von den Internationalen Beziehungen läßt sich vorläufig beantworten: Die Entwicklung der Lehre von den Internationalen Beziehungen hat - in Reaktion auf außerwissenschaftliche, politisch-gesellschaftliche Krisenphänomene - eine Reihe unterschiedlicher Großtheorien internationaler Beziehungen gezeitigt, die die Phänomene der internationalen Politik mit je unterschiedlichem Erkenntnisinteresse und davon abhängiger Fragestellung auf der Grundlage je verschiedener anthropologischer, ethisch-normativer und methodischer Vorverständnisse zu erfassen suchen. Diese Großtheorien differieren im Blick auf ihre ontologischen, d.h. die Natur des Erkenntnisgegenstandes betreffenden Grundannahmen: sie formulieren unterschiedliche Prämissen und Annahmen über die Beschaffenheit, Qualität und Struktur des internationalen Milieus, d.h. des Handlungs(um)feldes internationaler Akteure; über Beschaffenheit, Qualität und Charakter der in diesem Handlungs(um)feld (überwiegend) handelnden Einheiten, d.h. der internationalen Akteure selbst; über die von diesen verfolgten Interessen und Ziele sowie über die Mittel, die zur Verwirklichung dieser Interessen und Ziele gemeinhin ein- gesetzt werden.

17 Theorienkonkurrenz, nicht Theorienwechsel Jede Großtheorie zeichnet ein für sie charakteristisches Weltbild internationaler Beziehungen; Großtheorien und wissenschaftliche Weltbilder konkurrieren miteinander, ohne daß letztlich entschieden werden kann, welche dieser Großtheorien und Weltbilder die (einzig) richtige Deutung der internationalen Wirklichkeit darstellt. Denn dazu würde die Wissenschaft einen archimedischen Punkt über und außerhalb der Konkurrenz ihrer Großtheorien - oder gleichsam eine Meta-Großtheorie - benötigen, die es erlaubte, Kriterien für die Wahrheit oder Falschheit jener Prämissen zu etablieren, auf die die einzelnen Großtheorien ihre Aussagen zurückführen. Ein solcher archimedischer Punkt ist gegenwärtig nicht in Sicht !

18 Großtheorie AkteurMilieuStrukturprinzip Realismus Nationalstaat Staatenwelt als anarchischer (Natur-) Zustand vertikale Segmentierung, unlimitiertes Nullsummenspiel um Macht, Einfluss, Ressourcen Englische Schule Staatenwelt als rechtlich verfasste internationale Staatengesellschaft vertikale Segmentierung, durch Norm und Übereinkunft geregeltes Nullsummenspiel Idealismus IndividuumWeltgesellschaft als internationale Gesellschaft der Individuen universalistische Verfassung GROßTHEORIEN INTERNATIONALER BEZIEHUNGEN

19 GroßtheorieAkteurMilieuStrukturprinzip Interdependenz- orientierter Globalismus individuelle oder gesellschaftliche Akteure transnationale Gesellschaft funktionale, grenzübergreifende Vernetzung Imperialismus- theorien individuelle oder gesellschaftliche Akteure, die Klasseninteressen vertreten internationale Klassengesellschaft gesellschaftlich: horizontale grenzübergreifende Schichtung; (macht-)politisch: vertikale Segmentierung der imperialistischen Konkurrenten Dependenzorientier ter Globalismus: Dependenztheorien und Theorien des kapitalistischen Weltsystems gesellschaftliche und nationalstaatliche Akteure, die Klasseninteressen vertreten kapitalistisches Weltsystem als Schichtungssystem von Metropolen und Peripherien horizontale Schichtung nationaler Akteure im Weltsystem; strukturelle Abhängigkeit der Peripherien von den Metropolen; strukturelle Heterogenität der Peripherien

20 RealismusPluralismusStrukturalismus Hauptakteure Staaten Staaten und nichtstaatliche gesellschaftliche Akteure gesellschaftliche und nationalstaatliche Akteure, die Klasseninteressen vertreten Kernfragen und Hauptprobleme Internationale Anarchie; Sicherheitsdilemma; Machtstreben Transnationalismus und Interdependenz, aber keine klaren Problem- hierarchien zwischen Sachgebieten Ausbeutung, Imperialismus, (Entwicklung der) Unterentwicklung in Zentrums-Peripherie- Relationen HauptprozesseStreben nach militärischer und/ oder ökonomischer Sicherheit; Balance of Power Bargaining; Management von Problemkomplexen; Veränderung der Wertehierarchien Streben nach ökonomischer Dominanz HauptergebnisseKrieg oder (negativer) Frieden Erfolgreiches Management komplexer Interdependenz Spaltung der Weltgesellschaft zwischen Zentrum und Peripherie; kontinuierliche Ausbeutung der (armen) Peripherie durch das (reiche) Zentrum Perspektivische Konsequenzen unterschiedlicher IB-Theorien


Herunterladen ppt "Does Theory Matter ?? What is and why do we study international theory ?"

Ähnliche Präsentationen


Google-Anzeigen